The Media and Environmental Policy

The Media and Environmental Policy - The Media and...

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The Media and  Environmental Policy
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Objectivity Ideal definition- Accurate and  without reporter bias (similarity across sources) Critic’s definition- what passes  for real in a given time and  society
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Balance Ideal definition- shows multiple  points of view Multiple sources Critic’s definition- Are there  always two sides to a story?
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Corporate Media  Consequences “Commercial bias”- what will catch people’s  attention so advertiser’s will spend $? To keep interest, content is dramatized and  simplified Conflicts of interest in funding? Example: How can NBC cover nuclear  power fairly without upsetting General  Electric (a “corporate parent”)? This can matter- in a study, 33% of  newspaper editors felt they wouldn’t feel free  to publish news harmful to their corporate  parents
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Media Agenda Setting News reporting “may not be 
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course POL 223 taught by Professor Aldrich during the Fall '10 term at Purdue.

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The Media and Environmental Policy - The Media and...

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