29_CHM115_09

29_CHM115_09 - CHM 115 Lecture 29 Polymers: Big Picture...

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CHM 115 CHM 115 Lecture 29 Lecture 29
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2 Polymers: Big Picture DNA, proteins, and cellulose are all biopolymers. Polymers can be made by condensation reactions or addition reactions The three types of architecture (linear, branched, crosslinked) lead to very different physical properties.
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3 Polymer Structure Linear Branched Cross linked
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4 Condensation Polymerization Two monomers react and form a chain and a second small molecule + H 2 O Amino acids Dipeptide
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5 Polyamides
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6 Synthesis: Addition Polymer Ion or radical adds across C=C or C C QuickTimeᆰ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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7 Polyvinylchloride (PVC) Addition Polymer QuickTimeᆰ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture.
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8 What are the ways we treat cancer? Surgery Physical removal of cancerous tumor Radiation Chemotherapy Destroys all rapidly dividing cells – that includes cancer cells, but also Cells in your hair (hair loss) Bone marrow (fatigue) Stomach lining (nausea) Biologic therapies
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9 Gleevec: a bcr-abl inhibitor Bcr-abl is a  phosphorylating  agent: it adds phosphorous to  proteins that don’t want phosphorous to behave normally!  Source of the  cancer Gleevec prevents the substrate from binding, so  phosphorylation can’t occur, and cancer doesn’t form
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10 How does Gleevec fit into the lock? Intermolecular forces! Hydrogen bond donors Hydrogen bond acceptors
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11 Crystalline solids When most liquids are cooled, they eventually freeze and form crystalline solids , solids in which the atoms, ions, or molecules are arranged in a definite repeating pattern .
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12 Crystalline solids Some solids (such as diamonds and the individual grains in sugar and table salt) are single crystal. Most common crystalline solids are aggregates of many small crystals. Common examples of the latter are sandstone, chunks of ice, granite, and metal objects. QuickTimeᆰ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decom are needed to see this pict QuickTimeᆰ and a TIFF (Uncompressed) de are needed to see this p Granite tile for countertops.
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13 Unit cells One of the characteristic properties of a crystalline solid is the small volume of the crystal that can be used as a repeat unit to build the crystal.
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29_CHM115_09 - CHM 115 Lecture 29 Polymers: Big Picture...

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