The_Media[1] - The Media Unit 16 Introduction Outside of...

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The Media The Media Unit 16 Unit 16 Introduction Outside of government institutions, the mass media is perhaps the most influential in shaping policy decisions and elections. The framers of the Constitution were aware of the role the press would play in America’s young democracy. It is no coincidence that freedom of the press constitutes the First Amendment in the Bill of Rights
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The Media The Media An Emerging Influence An Emerging Influence The media’s role in government dates back to the colonial era (1607-1776), when daily newspapers were the sole source of political as well as other news for the colonists. American Revolution: 25 weekly newspapers, some supporting independence, others opposed. Alexander Hamilton: The Gazette of the US Thomas Jefferson: National Gazette The party faithful was the primary audience, not the general public.
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The Golden Era of Newspapers The Golden Era of Newspapers The invention of the telegraph in the1840s allowed news to spread to American cities faster than before The creation in 1848 of the Associated Press (AP) led to the development of the popular press; facts presented in an unbiased manner. US becoming more urbanized Newspapers did not need political support Between 1870 and 1900, newspaper circulation grew from 5 million to 15 million. The period from 1880-1925 is considered the “Golden Era of Newspapers, as daily papers gained enormous influence with politicians, business leaders, and the public.
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Radio and Television Radio and Television Radio In 1920 Westinghouse became the first commercial radio station. By 1930, almost 40% of Americans owned radios President Franklin D. Roosevelt used radio for his famous “fireside chats.” Television In 1939, fewer than 5% of Americans owned a television In 1950, 90% A 1994 poll revealed that 74% of Americans received their news from television Degree of competition (pp. 183-84)
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The Impact of the Internet The Impact of the Internet In 2000, over 50% of Americans had at least one computer; 4/10 households used
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The_Media[1] - The Media Unit 16 Introduction Outside of...

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