Math 1025 Lesson Plan Chapter 3v2 - Page |1 Math 1025...

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P a g e | 1 Math 1025 - Statistics Chapter 3 - Probability Section 3.1 - Basic Concepts of Probability Objectives Identify the sample space of a probability experiment Identify simple events Use the Fundamental Counting Principle Distinguish among classical probability, empirical probability, and subjective probability Determine the probability of the complement of an event Use a tree diagram and the Fundamental Counting Principle to find probabilities 1) Probability experiment - An action, or trial, through which specific results (counts, measurements, or responses) are obtained. 2) Outcome - The result of a single trial in a probability experiment. Sample Space - The set of all possible outcomes of a probability experiment. 3) Event - Consists of one or more outcomes and is a subset of the sample space. Try It Yourself 1 (p. 133) Probability experiment consists of recording responses to a survey about (1) There should be Term limits for U.S. senators: Agree, Disagree, No Opinion and (2) the gender of the Respondent. Another probability experiment consists of: (2) There should be Term limits for U.S. senators: Agree, Disagree, No Opinion and (2) the Respondent's political party Democrat, Republican or Other. c. Find the number of Outcomes in the sample space (use Tree Diagram). d. List the sample space {look at problem number #6 p. 142? - sample space for tossing 3 coins} 4) Simple event - An event that consists of a single outcome. An event that consists of more than one outcome is not a simple event. Try It Yourself 2 (p. 133) Ask for student's age at Last Birthday (1) Event C - The student's age is between 18 & 23, inclusive. (2) Event D- The student's age is 20. a. Determine the number of outcomes in the event. d. The Student's age is 20. {look at problem number #12 p. 142? - randomly select a card from a standard deck . Event: select a 4 of hearts} 5) Fundamental Counting Principle - If one event can occur in m ways and a second event can occur in n ways, the number of ways the two events can occur in sequence is m*n . Can be extended for any number of events occurring in sequence. Try It Yourself 3 (p. 134) You are buying a new car. Possible manufacturer's sizes and colors are: (1) Maker: Ford, GM, Honda and Toyota. (2) Car Size: Compact, Midsize, Large (3) Color : white, red, black, green, tan, grey a. Determine the number of ways each event can occur.
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P a g e | 2 b. Use the fundamental counting principle. c. Use a tree diagram to check (huge!) {look at problem number #16 p. 142? - 6 question True or False quiz.} Try It Yourself 4 (p. 135) revised - how many ways can you make a MN license plate? 3 Letters and 3 digits. a. Identify each event and the number of ways each event can occur. b. Use the fundamental counting principle. 6) Classical (theoretical) Probability - Each outcome in a sample space is equally likely.
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