Chapter Three - Globalization and Cultural Change

Chapter Three- - Chapter Three Globalization Cultural Change Culture and globalization Some key questions Does globalization countries and peoples

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Chapter Three Globalization & Cultural Change
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Culture and globalization Some key questions: Does globalization – countries and peoples becoming evermore interconnected and interdependent – inevitably result in an attack on culture and tradition? If so, to what extent can the U.S. be held responsible for this? What are the reasons for anti-Americanism and how are they related to (anti-)globalization?
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Culture – revisited Let’s revisit our definition of culture and the model we used: We defined culture as “ a learned pattern of behavior representing shared values and beliefs within a particular group .” Accordingly, culture and tradition are “attacked” when critical shared values and beliefs are undermined or displaced. This can be through (foreign) Products (e.g. McDonalds, Coca Cola, Hollywood movies, etc.) or Ideas and influence (e.g. freedom and liberty, democracy, free speech, attitudes to sex/marriage/the family, religion, materialism, fast food, etc.) Foreign products become a threat as opposed to a nuisance only when they begin to undermine a society’s core values or view of itself. A simple example. The French are (were!) fundamentally more opposed to McDonalds than the British, the Germans or the Japanese. Why? Answer: fine French cuisine (and wine) and lengthy meals are a key part of the French psyche and tradition. The ready adoption of fast food by French youth undermines their very culture.
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Ideas and influence pose a greater challenge to culture and tradition Globalization by definition results in change. Change can be both good and bad. The two most sensitive areas of change are political change and economic change because they can affect who holds the power in a society. The more “closed” a society (e.g. traditional, fundamentalist,
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course ECON 111 taught by Professor Risnit during the Spring '11 term at SUNY Suffolk.

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Chapter Three- - Chapter Three Globalization Cultural Change Culture and globalization Some key questions Does globalization countries and peoples

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