2 Code-switching

2 Code-switching - Andrew Simpson, Language, Society and...

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Andrew Simpson, Language, Society and Culture, USC Language, Society and Culture Unit 2 Diglossia and Code-switching In unit 1, we mentioned the fact that people in multilingual communities may often switch between different languages that they speak. Holmes (1997) describes an example of such a situation in part of northern Norway where two varieties of language are commonly used: Ranamal, a local Norwegian dialect, and Bokmal (literally ‘book language’) which is one of the two officially standardized forms of Norwegian (discussed more in unit 4). The following is a partial list of the different kinds of situation where Ranamal and Bokmal are typically used: R a n a m a l B o k m a l to family, friends, neighbours used by teachers in school to local shopkeepers used in church used in government offices used on TV, radio used to people from outside of the area used by university students to discuss politics At the end of unit 1, we highlighted various factors which may dictate the choice of language used. These included the social setting, who is being spoken to, and the topic of the conversation. Another example of a multilingual situation that was mentioned in unit 1 was the situation in a northern Italian town where villagers regularly switch between three languages – German, Friulian and Italian. These languages are used to different groups of people and in different activities: German Friulian Italian at home with people from the with people from beyond in the village surrounding area the region for reading, writing The different languages people speak constitute their linguistic repertoires
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Andrew Simpson, Language, Society and Culture, USC In order to become aware of the differences in language selected in daily life, it is useful to ask what types of language are used in a number of different contexts or domains , as below: addressee setting topic parent home planning a meal friend at the beach swimming, TV etc priest church aspects of religion/the church teacher school maths, physics employer place of work hours of work etc If we apply this to speakers in Paraguay where almost everyone regularly speaks two languages – Spanish and Guarani – we get the following results: addressee setting topic parent home planning a meal Guarani friend at the beach swimming, TV etc Guarani priest church aspects of religion Spanish teacher school maths, physics Guarani employer place of work hours of work etc
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2012 for the course ECON 293 taught by Professor Akbulut during the Spring '11 term at South Carolina.

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2 Code-switching - Andrew Simpson, Language, Society and...

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