ECE2025-L06 - General Information ECE2025 Spring 2012...

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ECE2025 Spring 2012 School of Electrical & Computer Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology LECTURE #6 Periodic Signals, Harmonics & Time Varying Frequency January 30, 2012 Spring 2012 EE-2025 Spring-2012 jMc-BHJ 2 General Information t-square: OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENTS Old Quizzes & Problems are part of the huge database on the SP-First CDROM website (linked on t-square) Quiz #1 on 6-Feb (Monday), a week from now Allowed one page of handwritten notes Calculators permitted Coverage up to this lecture (periodic/harmonic signal & time-varying spectrum) Review session, 2/3 Friday 6pm, here VL W200 Spring 2012 EE-2025 Spring-2012 jMc-BHJ 3 Lab Info Always start early; come prepared Learn to do teamwork in lab report; teamwork is part of professional life Miscellaneous ERRORS ? ALWAYS Check Announcements In-lab Verification worth 10 points Complete Instructor Verification in lab before you leave; incomplete verification loses points; blank verification means no lab attendance Spring 2012 EE-2025 Spring-2012 jMc-BHJ 4 READING ASSIGNMENTS This Lecture: Chapter 3, Sections 3-2 and 3-3 Chapter 3, Sections 3-7 and 3-8 Next Lecture: Fourier Series ANALYSIS Sections 3-4, 3-5 and 3-6
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Spring 2012 EE-2025 Spring-2012 jMc-BHJ 5 Problem Solving Skills Math Formula Sum of Cosines Amp, Freq, Phase Recorded Signals Speech Music No simple formula Plot & Sketches x ( t ) versus t Spectrum MATLAB Numerical Computation Plotting list of numbers Notes on Amplitude Change Spring 2012 EE-2025 Spring-2012 jMc-BHJ 6 In HW3, there is an example of “fading”–a signal is received after going through multiple routes with different phase changes; these signals may be combined (i.e., added) constructively (i.e., in phase) or destructively (out of phase), resulting in different received signal amplitudes Another possible change in signal is amplitude attenuation as a function of distance - E.g., the friction of air molecules will cause the amplitude of a sound to reduce as a function of distance from the source - Let’s say, a signal reduces its amplitude by half after traveling a distance of 50m; then, at 150m, its amplitude is only (0.5) 150/50 or 1/8 th of its original amplitude Spring 2012 EE-2025 Spring-2012 jMc-BHJ 7
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2012 for the course ECE 2025 taught by Professor Juang during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Tech.

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ECE2025-L06 - General Information ECE2025 Spring 2012...

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