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L10_Tiles - GameBoy Advance Programming Tiles Atari 196 As...

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GameBoy Advance Programming Tiles
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Atari 196?: As an engineering student at the University of Utah, Nolan Bushnell liked to sneak into the computer labs late at night to play computer games on the university's $7 million mainframes. 1972: Bushnell founded Atari with $250 of his own money and another $250 from business partner Ted Dabney. They then created and commercialized the world's first commercial video game, Pong. Bushnell was 27 years old. 1976: Warner Communications buys Atari from Bushnell for $28 million. 1977: Atari introduces the Atari Video Computer System (VCS), later renamed the Atari 2600 1978: December - Atari announces the Atari 400 and 800 personal computers. 1979: October - Atari begins shipping the Atari 400 and Atari 800 personal computers.
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Typical Atari 800 Screenshot
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Atari Graphics Graphics and Text Modes Display List Customizable Fonts Area in memory that described fonts (characters) Area in memory that was what went on screen Player/Missile Graphics
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GBA Tiles Logical extension of the customizable character sets. Some of the terms used today are based on the historical derivation of the technology (The logical extension of the player/missle graphics is sprites)
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Mode 3 Bitmaps Video Controller Screen Video Memory What color to make a certain pixel
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Mode 4 Bitmaps Video Controller Screen Video Memory What color index number to make a certain pixel Palette Memory What color is that index?
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Mode 0 Tilemaps Video Processing Circuitry Screen Video Memory Tile Map (Screen Blocks) What tile number to put where Palette Memory What color is that? Video Memory Tile Images (Character Blocks) What does that tile look like?
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Tiles On Screen 30 20
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Tiles & Tilemaps Tile (or Tile Image) 8x8 bitmap image Treated like big pixels, as the building block of an image 16 or 256 colors 32 or 64 bytes/tile Tile Map (where to put tiles on screen) 2D array of tile indexes Tile : Tilemap :: Pixel : Bitmap
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Tradeoff 8 bpp = 256 colors Lots of colors All tiles share the same palette. Tile images take more space 4 bpp = 16 palettes of 16 colors apiece Still have 256 colors More constraints More flexibility Tile images smaller (i.e. can have more)
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Illustrations from Tonc
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GBA Tile Mode Features Up to 4 tiled background layers Up to 1024x1024 pixels each Hardware scrolling Maps can be larger than the screen Hardware Parallax (optional) Layers scroll at different speeds to simulate depth Affine transformation (optional) Rotation and scaling effects
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Basic Steps to Tiles Create tile images store them in a character block Create screen map and store it in one or more screen blocks Create a palette Set image control buffer
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Steps to Tiles Create tile images Create screen image Create a palette Store tile images in a character block Store screen image in one or more screen blocks Store palette in palette memory area Set image control buffer and Mode
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Steps to Tiles 1.
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