MITMAS_531F09_lec09_2b

MITMAS_531F09_lec09_2b - New Directions in Imaging Sensors...

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© 2006 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved New Directions in Imaging Sensors Ravi Athale, MITRE Corporation OIDA Annual Forum 19 November 2008
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© 2006 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved 2 We live in x x x x age information , biotech , nano , neurotech, quantum… Regardless of the answer, we live in an age of IMAGES! Images (clockwise from upper left) from US Govt Agencies: NSA/ESA; 9-11 Commission; NIMH; NIH. Photo removed due to copyright restrictions. A person using his cell phone to take of photo of a fire or explosion.
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© 2006 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved 3 xponential Growth in Camera Technology Stand-alone digital cameras: 1991: Kodak DCS-100, 1280x1024 pixels, $30,000 2008: Kodak Easyshare V1003, 10 Megapixel, $170 Total Digital Camera Volume > 150 million Cellphone cameras: 1997: First baby birth recorded on cell phone camera (VGA res) 2008: Samsung SCH-B600, 10 Megapixel, 30% of cell phone contain cameras Total cell phone volume to reach 1 billion Courtesy of Barry Hendry ( Wikipedia )
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© 2006 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved 4 Mammoth Camera: 1900 In 1900, George R. Lawrence built this mammoth 900 lb. camera, then the world’s largest, for $5,000 (enough to purchase a large house at that time!) It took 15 men to move and operate the gigantic camera. The photographer was commissioned by the Chicago & Alton Railway to make the largest photograph (the plate was 8 x 4.5 ft in size!) of its train for the company’s pamphlet "The Largest Photograph in the World of the Handsomest Train in the World." World’s Smallest Cameras: 2006 Medigus Corp. Israeli medical imaging company 1.8 mm Endoscope But….basic Camera Architecture Remained Unchanged over 100 years Medigus Introspicio Camera 1.8 mm, 326x382 pixels OmniVision OV6920 sensor, 2.1 x 2.3 mm; PillCam http://www.medigus.com/CAMERA_1_8_mm/Camera.aspx http://www.letsgodigital.org/en/8687/omnivision_camerachip_ov6920/
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© 2006 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved 5 Other Observations: ± Detector arrays in visible wavelength scaling up very rapidly 100 Mpixel available Gigapixel possible (1.2 micron pixel over 35 mm sq array) ± Conventional imaging optics (wide FOV, high resolution) scales very poorly (heavy, bulky, expensive) ± Governing principles Maximum sample rate for all parameters everywhere Fixed resource allocation Measure everything then process ± Information unevenly distributed => most of the mega pixels contain very little to no information ± Large data volume (Multi GB/frame) overwhelming processing and communications.
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© 2006 The MITRE Corporation. All rights reserved
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2012 for the course MAS. 131 taught by Professor Rameshraskar during the Fall '09 term at MIT.

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MITMAS_531F09_lec09_2b - New Directions in Imaging Sensors...

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