7d10b1e1-5a1c-4af7-9420-66642a152032_isearch_book_two-proofed

7d10b1e1-5a1c-4af7-9420-66642a152032_isearch_book_two-proofed

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“The door of the jail being flung open from within, there appeared, in the first place, like a black shadow emerging into the sunshine” (Hawthorne 43). As the dark atmosphere of the author’s words smear into the reader’s minds, we can already sense the dimness of the novel. The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne has finally landed on my hands, urging me to open up its pages as the themes of the novel were patiently waiting to pop up. Hawthorne categorizes his themes into smaller subjects of injustice while the novel introduces the readers into new prejudice topics (better to say: “new topics on the theme of prejudice”) . “It would be sad injustice, the reader must understand, to represent all my excellent old friends as in their dotage” (Hawthorne 14). The adventure begins. The Scarlet Letter definitely has its focus on the darkness of the society during the mid-seventeenth century. The novel beings with Hester Prynne, the protagonist, being released from prison as she displays her scarlet “A” to the townspeople in public with a
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7d10b1e1-5a1c-4af7-9420-66642a152032_isearch_book_two-proofed

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