Edema2 - Dr Manal Gabril Assistant professor Pathology LHSC University Campus Blood flow normal fluid homeostasis ◦ Edema ◦ Hyperemia ◦

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Unformatted text preview: Dr. Manal Gabril Assistant professor Pathology, LHSC, University Campus Blood flow- normal fluid homeostasis ◦ Edema ◦ Hyperemia ◦ Hemorrhage Maintenance of blood as a liquid ◦ Thrombosis Embolism Infarct Shock Both indicate a local increased volume of blood in a particular tissue. Dilatation of arteries/arterioles results in increased blood flow (perfusion) of a tissue or organ The tissue appears red. ◦ Because of engorgement with oxygenated blood Example: ◦ “redness” of acute inflammation due to hyperemia. ◦ Skeletal muscle during exercise Impaired venous drainage results in stasis and the accumulation of deoxygenated blood Due to increase in venous hydrostatic pressure The tissue has a bluish tinge due to the accumulation of deoxygenated hemoglobin Examples: ◦ Cardiac failure ◦ Isolated venous obstruction Thrombophlebitis Chronic dilated, congested central veins-> necrosis (dark spots) unaffected surrounding liver tissue (pale spots). A consequence of tightly regulated processes that maintain blood in a fluid , clot-free state in normal vessels The pathologic form of hemostasis is thrombosis Blood fluid state depends on: ◦ Integrity of vessels (vascular wall) ◦ Normal blood flow...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course PATHOLOGY 3245 taught by Professor X during the Spring '11 term at UWO.

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Edema2 - Dr Manal Gabril Assistant professor Pathology LHSC University Campus Blood flow normal fluid homeostasis ◦ Edema ◦ Hyperemia ◦

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