INT #3

INT #3 - INT Notes #3 Part 3: From the 1950s to present...

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INT Notes #3 Part 3: From the 1950s to present Mies in America Farnsworth House, 1945- 51 Advance ideas of democracy Minimalism Emphasis upon: o Volume o Regularity The intrinsic elegance of materials, technical perfection, and fine proportions Farnsworth House, 1945-51 o Two rectangular slabs floating o No air conditioning, wanted purity o Minimize their visual presence. o To blur the usual boundaries defining domesticity. o Distinctions between public and private, outside and inside, often disappear. o Asymmetrically placed core volume, Same concept, different relationship with the site
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Glass house, Phillips Johnson One: connected to ground, other, Japanese and elevated One: asymmetrical with different levels, other is one Miles only uses glass and steel IIT Campus in Chicago: Crown Hall by Mies Lake shore Drive Apartments, Chicago Industrialized abstraction Clear expression of load and support Impersonal features, precious steel detailing Certain grandeur in the approach, steps, platform, ceremonial ascension Weightless feeling Vast, uninterrupted universal space A “good space” for everything, no individuality or sense of place Lake shore Drive Apartments, Chicago Perceived in constant tension Elevators at the centers, luxury apartments at the edges Verticality emphasized by slender I- beams attached at regular periods, no structural purpose, but rather to “express” the structure. Rational Puritanism of “less is more”
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Seagram Building, NYC "The essence of space is not determined by the mere presence of limiting surfaces but by the spiritual principle of this limitation. The true task of architecture is to let the structure articulate the space; it is not the building that is the work of art but space." -Mies van der Rohe Interiors by Florence Knoll Le Corbusier “Nothing is transmissible, except thought.” In the latest part of his life, he worked on highly poetic production, not purist. Mythical, organic, harmony with landscape and universe
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Religious buildings Unite ́ d’Habitacion de Marseilles (1947-53) Le Corbusier Maisons Jaoul, Paris, 1951-4 Monastery La Tourette, near Lyon Chapel at Romchanp, France and Chandigarh, India a prototype of communal living, a collective housing experimentation French beton brut, or "raw concrete", ́ Brutalism o Unfinished, raw concrete
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Le Modulor Maisons Jaoul, Paris, 1951 Le Corbusier Dominican Monastery at La Tourette By Le Corbusier Connections of the human body to architecture Contrast with his earlier work The Dominicans requested a place based on traditional monasteries, where the sense of the sacred relied upon simple elements: light, stone, sense of proportion, hierarchy of spaces, solitude combined with communal work and rituals Innovative approach of the old typology of the monastery, adopting it to the sloping site Exposed concrete, a place of
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INT #3 - INT Notes #3 Part 3: From the 1950s to present...

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