BIOS E-1a Lecture 01 082911 annotated

BIOS E-1a Lecture 01 082911 annotated - BIOS E-1a:...

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Unformatted text preview: BIOS E-1a: Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology Fall 2011 1 BIOS E-1a and BIOS E-1b provide a one-year introduction to modern biology that fulfills medical school requirements. During some weeks, students attend a laboratory instead of a lecture. BIOS E-1a focuses on the general principles of cellular biology. Topics include the structure of cells, the distinction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, enzymes and cellular metabolism, and the general principles of modern genetics. Description: Prerequisites: High school mathematics, chemistry, and biology; although CHEM E-1a and E-1b, or their equivalents, are not required, they are strongly recommended. BIOS E-1a and BIOS E-1b provide a one-year introduction to modern biology that fulfills medical school requirements. During some weeks, students attend a laboratory instead of a lecture. BIOS E-1a focuses on the general principles of cellular biology. Topics include the structure of cells, the distinction between prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, enzymes and cellular metabolism, and the general principles of modern genetics. Description: Prerequisites: High school mathematics, chemistry, and biology; although CHEM E-1a and E-1b, or their equivalents, are not required, they are strongly recommended. 2 Bill Anderson Bauer Laboratory, Room 204 7 Divinity Avenue Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:00-7:00pm * * 3 Dr. Tara Mann Bauer Laboratory, Room 204 7 Divinity Avenue Office Hours: Mondays and Wednesdays, 6:00-7:00pm * * 4 Required text: Hillis et al. Principles of Life 5 Grading: Exam #1 25% Exam #2 25% Laboratory 25% Final Exam 25% Course website: http://isites.harvard.edu/course/ext-13096/2011/fall Course email: BIOS.E1ab@gmail.com 6 A and A grades represent work whose superior quality indicates a full mastery of the subject and, in the case of A, work of extraordinary distinction. There is no grade of A+. B+ , B , and B grades represent work of good to very good quality throughout the term; however, it does not merit special distinction. C+ , C , and C grades designate an average command of the course material. D+ , D , and D grades indicate work that shows a deficiency in knowledge of the material. E is a failing grade representing work that deserves no credit. E may also be assigned to students who do not submit required work in courses from which they have not officially withdrawn by the withdrawal deadline. A student who does not complete the requirements of a course will be assigned a zero or E for the missing work. The student ` s letter grade will include no credit for the missing work in the calculation of the final grade. Letter grade assignment: (Harvard Extension School grade policy) 7 Grading scheme: Assume the average is a B. Each standard deviation represents a letter grade....
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course BIOLOGY 102 taught by Professor Anderson during the Spring '11 term at Harvard.

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BIOS E-1a Lecture 01 082911 annotated - BIOS E-1a:...

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