Final Summary - Chapter 7 Wireless Mobile Computing and Mobile Commerce Wireless is a term used to describe telecommunications in which

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Chapter 7: Wireless, Mobile Computing, and Mobile Commerce Wireless is a term used to describe telecommunications in which electromagnetic waves (rather than some form of wire or cable) carry the signal between communication devices (computer, PDAs, cell phone, etc.). Mobile Computing refers to a real-time, wireless connection between a mobile device and other computing environments, such as the internet or an intranet. Mobile Commerce (M-Commerce) refers to e-commerce (EC) transactions that are conducted in wireless environment, especially via the internet. Pervasive Computing (Ubiquitous Computing) means that virtually every object has processing power with wireless or wired connections to a global network. Wireless technologies include both wireless devices and wireless transmission media . Wireless devices are small enough to easily carry or wear, have sufficient computing power to perform productive tasks and can communicate wirelessly with the Internet and other devices. Advantages of wireless device: o Can make productive use of time that was formerly wasted (work in cars or public transportation) o Work locations become much more flexible . o Enable to allocate working time around personal and professional obligations. Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) is the standard that enables wireless devices with tiny display screens, low bandwidth connections and minimal memory to access Web-based information and services. Microbrowsers are internet browsers with a small file size that can work within low-memory constraints of wireless devices and the low bandwidths of wireless networks. Wireless Devices include pages, email handhelds, PDAs, cellular phones, and smart phones. o Pager is a one-way, wireless messaging system; it alerts the user when it receives an incoming message. o E-mail Handhelds , such as the BlackBerry , have a small display screen and a keypad for typing short message. E-mail Handhelds help to keep in touch with clients and the office. o Cell Phone use radio wave to provide two-way communication. The cell phone communicates with radio antennas (towers) placed within adjacent geographic areas call cells. Cellular technology, nowadays provides high transmission speeds and richer features (SMS, 3G, Video, WWW), has progressed through four stages: First generation (1G) – Analog signals and low bandwidth. Second generation (2G) – Digital Signals for voice communication. Speed up to 10 Kbps. 2.5 G – Digital Signals for voice communication. Speed up to 144 Kbps. Third generation (3G) – Digital Signals for voice communication. Speed up to 128 Kbps (in car), 384 Kbps (walking), and 2 Mbps (fixed). o Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) are small, handheld computers that can transmit digital communications. PDAs provide electronic schedulers, address books, emails service, wireless internet access, camera, and voice communication (some only).
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course ADMS ADMS 2511 taught by Professor Colen during the Spring '11 term at York University.

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Final Summary - Chapter 7 Wireless Mobile Computing and Mobile Commerce Wireless is a term used to describe telecommunications in which

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