intro2007-midterm - Psychology 110B Midterm Professor Paul...

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Page 1 Psychology 110B - Midterm Professor Paul Bloom February 28, 2007 INSTRUCTIONS 1. Please clearly PRINT your name on top of EVERY PAGE. Do this first. 2. There are a total of 22 pages, including this one. Unless explicitly noted, each question is worth one point. The questions add up to a total of 100 points 3. Do not spend too much time on any one question or you will have difficulty finishing in time. And don’t try to “pad” or add irrelevant information – this can end up hurting you if you make a mistake. 5. Please print your name on top of every page . I know I said this before, but sometimes people really do forget. 6. Don’t panic! Some of these questions are harder than others, and some are very hard indeed. We do not expect ANYONE to get everything right. (On the other hand, we also do not expect anyone to get everything wrong!). 7. Good luck!
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Page 2 YOUR NAME ________________________________________________ INTRODUCTION (Erik Cheries) I1. Who was "Clever Hans" and what important lesson did he contribute to psychology? (2 pts) I2. Developmental psychologists have argued that babies have considerable in- born knowledge of the physical world. This is most similar to the view of which philosopher A. Locke B. Kant C. Descartes D. Mill I3. ______________ use the concept of ____________ to explain how sensory experiences alone could ultimately lead to complex thought. A Nativists; innateness B. Dualists; empiricism C. Physiologists; reflexology D. Empiricists; association
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Page 3 YOUR NAME ________________________________________________ COGNITIVE DEVELOPMENT C1: It takes infants about 1 month of experience moving and observing the actions of others before they can successfully imitate facial expressions such as sticking out their tongue. TRUE FALSE C2: A developmental psychologist would like to determine whether a 5-month-old infant could discriminate a real object from a picture of that object. Describe an experiment you could run to test this using the habituation method. (3 pts) C3: In Piaget's theory of development _____________ serve as the mental blueprints for actions. a. symbols b. schemas c. beliefs d. stages
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Page 4 YOUR NAME ________________________________________________ C4: Which measure provides the best evidence that infants believe that objects will continue to exist when out of view? A. Reaching B. Looking time C. fMRI D. All of the above C5: American children start pretending very early in development—at about 2 years of age. This is likely to be: A. Because American parents encourage them to do so B. Because of exposure to television and movies C. Neither of the above D. Both of the above C6: According to Piaget, a child will succeed at conservation tasks when he or she is at the: A. Sensorimotor stage B. Preoperation stage C. Concrete operation stage D. Phallic stage C7: Modular theories of social understanding are most supported by the existence of: A. High-IQ children B. Autistic children C. Retarded children D. Deaf children learning sign language
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Page 5 YOUR NAME ________________________________________________ LANGUAGE (Izzat Jarudi) L1: Based on the Baker chapter in the Norton readings, describe one specific difference between English and Navajo. (Your answer has to show specific
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