Study+Guide+Test1 with answers

Study+Guide+Test1 with answers - DEP3053 (3896) Exam 1...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
DEP3053 (3896) Exam 1 Study Questions Spring 2011 *Exam 1: Wed. Feb. 2, 2010—bring a #2 pencil *All lecture material is important. Be sure to review text-related material that corresponds to lectures & text material identified in class (and study guide) but not covered in lecture. Test format is multiple-choice (~70%) and short answer (~30%) I. L ist of Topics Covered The topics and questions listed below reflect all the topics/issues that you are responsible for. You should also study those sections of the book that overlap with the notes, but emphasis will be given to the notes An asterick* means that this material was not covered in class but you are responsible for it— For these text book sections focus on terms in bold and major concepts and findings. Chapter 1 M ajor issues/themes of developmental psychology What is the difference between a continuity and discontinuity view of development? What is the difference between a nature and nurture view? What is the difference between normative vs . idiographic development? Research Designs What are the differences in each of the following designs? true experiments vs. quasi- experiments vs. correlations? What is the difference between an independent variable and a dependent variable? An independent variable is manipulated by the researcher; for example, in a study relating to the effects of violent videogames on aggressive behavior, the independent variable would be the violent videogames. A dependent variable is caused by the independent variable; for the above example, the DV is the aggressive behavior. When can causality be determined? Causality can be determined when all outside factors have been accounted for (SES, age, gender, etc.) and the study is a true experiment. Quasi-experiments cannot guarantee a causal relationship because they don’t allow for subjects to be assigned to different groups as in a true experiment. Random assignment is when participants are chosen to 1 of 2 or more groups solely out of chance: everyone has the same probability to be in any of the groups. Matching is when characteristics of the control group and the experimental group are similar; for example, if there
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
are ten 5 year olds and ten 10 year olds in the violent videogame experimental group, there should be ten 5 year olds and then 10 year olds in the control group to control for age differences. Matching ensures all groups are equal. What is the difference between positive and negative correlations? How are they measured? and interpreted? A positive correlation occurs when an increase in one variable causes an increase in the other variable, or a decrease in one variable causes a decrease in the other. A negative correlation occurs when an increase in one variable causes a decrease in the other variable. They are measured on a scale of -1 to 1. A correlation close to 1 shows a strong positive correlation, a correlation close to 0 indicates no relationship, and a correlation close to -1 shows a strong
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course DEP 3053 taught by Professor Miller during the Spring '08 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 10

Study+Guide+Test1 with answers - DEP3053 (3896) Exam 1...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online