dis7

dis7 - CS32 Discussion Sec.on 1B Week 8 TA: Brian...

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Unformatted text preview: CS32 Discussion Sec.on 1B Week 8 TA: Brian Choi Reminder •  Homework 4 –  Template class/func.ons •  Just follow the rules –  Recursion –  Big ­O analysis Quick Review of Big ­O •  N = size of input some code for ­loop (runs N .mes) { You need to see the function and analyze for ­loop (runs N .mes) { the run-time of this function: suppose it’s O some func.on call } (N) } while ­loop (runs N .mes) { print a character O(1) } O(N3) O(N2) O(N) O(N3) + O(N) = O(N3) Sor.ng Algorithms •  We switch gears and discuss some well known sor.ng algorithms. Selec.on Sort 4 3 1 5 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 2 4 5 3 1 2 3 5 4 1 2 3 4 5 •  Find the smallest item in the unsorted por.on, and place it in front. •  What is the running .me (complexity) of this algorithm? Inser.on Sort 4 3 1 5 2 3 4 1 5 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 2 3 4 5 •  Pick one from the unsorted part, and place it in the “right” posi.on in the sorted part. •  Best case? •  Avg. case? •  Worst case? Inser.on Sort 4 3 1 5 2 3 4 1 5 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 3 4 5 2 1 2 3 4 5 •  Pick one from the unsorted part, and place it in the “right” posi.on in the sorted part. •  Best case? O(n) •  Avg. case? O(n2) •  Worst case? O(n2) Merge Sort 3 7 6 5 8 2 1 4 3 7 6 5 3 7 3 7 6 5 6 5 8 2 1 4 8 2 8 2 1 4 1 4 Keep splitting Merge Sort 3 7 3 7 6 5 5 6 3 5 6 7 8 2 2 8 1 4 1 4 1 2 4 8 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Merge Merge Sort: Running Time? 3 7 6 5 8 2 1 4 O(n) 3 7 5 6 2 8 1 4 O(n) 3 5 6 7 1 2 4 8 O(n) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 O(log n) O(n)O(log n) = O(n log n) General Sor.ng: Running Time •  O(n log n) is faster than O(n2) – merge sort is more efficient than selec.on sort or inser.on sort. •  O(n log n) is the best average complexity that a general (comparison) sor.ng algorithm can get (assuming you know nothing about the data set). •  If more informa.on about the data set is provided, it’s possible to sort things almost linearly. Quick Sort 4 3 1 5 2 3 1 2 4 5 3 1 2 1 2 3 1 3 5 •  Pick a pivot, and move numbers that are less than the pivot to front, and ones that are greater than the pivot to end. •  On average, O(n log n) •  Depending on how you pick your pivots, it can be as bad as O(n2) Quick Ques.ons •  Given an unsorted array of n items, what is the best you can do to search an item, if you are to run this search only once? •  Given an unsorted array of n items, what is the best you can do to search an item, if you are to run such search 100 .mes? (assume: n >> 100) •  Given an unsorted array of n items, what is the best you can do to search an item, if you are to run this search n .mes? Tree: Defini.ons root node X No loop! link (edge) parent children siblings leaves height H subtree Bound on # of edges How many edges should there be in a tree of N nodes? H Binary Trees No node has more than 2 children (lei child + right child). Binary Trees How many nodes can a binary tree of height h have? (one with max. # of nodes == full binary tree) Tree is a data structure! •  For every data structure we need to know: –  how to insert a node, –  how to remove a node, –  search for a node •  and (for tree only) –  how to traverse the tree Tree is a data structure! •  For every data structure we need to know: –  how to insert a node, –  how to remove a node, –  search for a node •  and (for tree only) –  how to traverse the tree struct Node! {! ItemType val;! Node* left;! Node* right;! };! Three Methods of Traversal void preorder(Node *node)! {! cout << node->val << “ “;! preorder(node->left);! preorder(node->right);! }! void inorder(Node *node)! {! inorder(node->left);! cout << node->val << “ “;! inorder(node->right);! }! void postorder(Node *node)! {! postorder(node->left);! postorder(node->right);! cout << node->val << “ “;! }! Note: NULL check omitted – every function should have if (node == NULL) return;! Binary Search Tree •  At all nodes: –  All nodes in the lei subtree have smaller values than the current node’s value –  All nodes in the right subtree have larger values than the current node’s value •  Which traversal method should you use to: –  print values in the increasing order? –  print values in the decreasing order? Insert void insert(Node* &node, ItemType newVal)! {! } ! Insert void insert(Node* &node, ItemType newVal)! {! if (node == NULL)! node = new Node(newVal);! if (node->val > newVal)! insert(node->left, newVal);! else! insert(node->right, newVal);! }! Assume Node(val) sets left and right pointers of the new node to NULL. Insert •  Average .me complexity? –  as many steps as the height of the tree –  full tree: N = 2h+1  ­ 1 ≈ 2h+1 nodes –  h ≈ log2 N  ­ 1 –  Roughly, it takes O(log N). Search Node* search(Node *node, ItemType value)! {! } ! Search Node* search(Node *node, ItemType value)! {! if (node == NULL)! return NULL;! if (node->val == value)! return node;! else if (node->val > value)! return search(node->left, value);! else! return search(node->right, value);! }! Removal •  A limle tricky! •  Case ­by ­case analysis –  Case 1: the node is a leaf (easy) –  Case 2: the node has one child –  Case 3: the node has two children Case 3 copy Use in-order traversal to identify these nodes treeHeight int treeHeight(Node *node)! {! } ! treeHeight int treeHeight(Node *node)! {! if (node == NULL)! return -1;! int leftHeight = treeHeight(node->left);! int rightHeight = treeHeight(node->right);! if (leftHeight > rightHeight)! return leftHeight + 1;! else! return rightHeight + 1;! }! ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course CS 32 taught by Professor Davidsmallberg during the Spring '08 term at UCLA.

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