Orgo 2 - 2. Acids and Bases (2.1-2.5) Arrhenius Acids and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
2. Acids and Bases (2.1-2.5) Arrhenius Acids and Bases - According to Svante Arrhenius an acid is a substance that dissolves in water to produce H + ions and a base is a substance that dissolves in water to produce OH- ions. We now know that H + ions do not exist in water, they immediately react and become H 3 O+. H + + H 2 O H 3 O + . When an acid dissolves in water it reacts to produce H 3 O + . H 2 O + HCl H 3 O + + Cl. We show the transfer of a proton from an acid to a base by using a curved arrow. A change in position of an electron pair originating from an atom will form a new bond to that atom, while a change in position of an electron pair originating from a bond will result in breaking that bond. Many bases are metal hydroxides, these are ionic solids so when they dissolve in water their ions merely separate with each one solvated by water molecules. NaOH Na+ + OH - . Other bases are not hydroxides, they produce OH - ions in water by reacting with water molecules. NH 3 + H 2 O NH 4 + + OH - . Bronsted-Lowry Acids and Bases - Johannes Bronsted and Thomas Lowry proposed that an acid is a proton donor, a base is a proton acceptor, and an acid-base reaction is a proton-transfer reaction. Any pair of molecules or ions that can be interconverted by the transfer of a proton is called a conjugate acid-base pair. When an acid transfers a proton to a base, the acid is
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course SCIENCE 2213 taught by Professor Lee during the Spring '11 term at UWO.

Page1 / 2

Orgo 2 - 2. Acids and Bases (2.1-2.5) Arrhenius Acids and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online