Rise of Napoleon

Rise of Napoleon - TheRadicalRevolutionandRiseofNapoleon

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The Radical Revolution and Rise of Napoleon The Terror and Rise of Napoleon A. Towards the Radical Revolution   1. Anger towards the Revolution Many are upset with treatment of Clergy and Church Church’s power to tax ended, August 1789 Church lands confiscated and sold at public auction, beginning Dec.1789 Civil Constitution of the Clergy Decreed July 1790, King ratifies Dec. 1790 Insists that the clergy take an oath to the state Consolidates clerical opposition of the Revolution Drives many priests, nuns and monks into exile, or makes them political enemies Exiles called  Émigrés , or enemies of the state Vendée - region in france,devout catholics, army comes in wipes them out.  “Chouans in the Vendee” One of the larger uprisings.   2. Push for more Radicalization Radicals upset it has not gone far enough, questionable as to where Catholics  loyalties lie. Lives have not been improved Men or property are now oppressors Want a republic not a Monarchy
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Jacobins  (larger group, predominant group driving revolution, super radical)  constantly calling for more radicalization Sans-Culottes  emerge: Patriots who pressure king to reinstate radical ministers.  Normal people joining the situation   3. 1791 Constitution Achievement of the Moderate Revolution: 1. A constitutional monarchy established 2. Individual rights guaranteed 3. Powers of the monarch restricted 4. Further reduces the influence of the aristocracy 5. Creates a new, elected Legislative Assembly that reflects the power of the  people Unresolved: What role will the King play? What to do about the Church? What to do about social inequality? The Jacobin become more concerned about the constitution by the King, he runs  away to Varennes. B. The Wars Begin   1. External Skirmishes Wars begin in 1791 as skirmishes on the boundaries Émigrés fighting back  Prussian Army enters France, moves toward Paris Jacobins call for offensive measures War declared against the Austrians and Prussians by the National Assembly April  1792
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Later English and Russian join forces against the French Revolutionary Victories Desire to destroy ‘enemies of the Revolution’ Power of the levee on masse (the army) Revolutionary convictions of the army Belief in need to destroy other ‘old Regimes’ Faith in French ideas, French culture, and the French nation   2. September Massacres (September 1792) Follows arrest of the King 10 August 1792 Incited by fear that a Prussian army has conquered Verdun and is on its way to 
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course HIST 1003 taught by Professor Zucker during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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Rise of Napoleon - TheRadicalRevolutionandRiseofNapoleon

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