Lecture15Part2

Lecture15Part2 - Gainsborough Gainsborough Portraiture in Britain Thomas Gainsborough Mrs Richard Brinsley Sheridan 1787 oil o/canvas Gainsborough

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Unformatted text preview: Gainsborough: Gainsborough: Portraiture in Britain Thomas Gainsborough, Mrs. Richard Brinsley Sheridan, 1787, oil o/canvas Gainsborough: specialist for portrait painting; much in demand by the landed gentry Class distinction is stressed by pose, dress, environment Lush Rococo setting as backdrop; “feathery” brushwork, soft focus Gainsborough: Gainsborough: Portraiture in Britain Thomas Gainsborough, Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, c. 1750, oil o/canvas Double portrait of a rich landowning couple Rifle, dog>reference to hunt >privilege of the aristocracy Mr. Andrews was not “old money,” but a “nouveau rich” He’s simply posing as if he were a long­established landowner Gainsborough: Gainsborough: Portraiture in Britain Picture is all about ownership Mr. Andrews owns the land in background He has laborers: fields ploughed, stacked up sheaves of hey Land as the source of his wealth Do possessions include Mrs. Andrews? Wright of Derby: Wright of Derby: Scientific Experiments Joseph Wright of Derby, A Philosopher is Giving a Lecture at the Orrery (in which a lamp is put in place of the sun), c. 1763­ 1764, oil o/canvas Specialty: Paintings of scientific experiments and natural wonders with dramatic lighting effects Wright of Derby: Wright of Derby: Scientific Experiments Center: A so­called Orrery (model of the solar system) Candle placed in lieu of the sun; only light source; dramatic shadows Planets move along artificial orbits, cast shadows “Scientific machines” all the rage for entertainment and education in the late 18th century Explain the world rationally and in secular terms; empiricism (only that which can be proven through Wright of Derby: Wright of Derby: Scientific Experiments Emotional intensity Human drama Intellectual curiosity Serious matter Scientific pursuit of knowledge a problem for all ages (children included) Wright of Derby: Wright of Derby: Scientific Experiments Joseph Wright of Derby, Experiment with the Air Pump, 1768, oil o/canvas A different experimental set up: glass sphere that imprisons a live cockatoo Air pump is creating an artificial vacuum: bird threatens to suffocate Wright of Derby: Wright of Derby: Scientific Experiments Purpose of experiment: Show that no living being can survive in a vacuum (without oxygen) Cruel experiment, but grand drama: let the bird come as close to suffocation as possible, then release the vacuum Wright of Derby: Wright of Derby: Scientific Experiments Another example of Wright of Derby’s use of dramatic light emanating from a single source of Light Variety of emotional responses: compassion for girls; boy has no qualms Serious, moralizing intent: skull fragment in a mysteriously glowing glass beaker: mortality as a universal feature of all Hogarth: Hogarth: Moralizing Satire William Hogarth, The Contract, from Marriage à la mode series, c. 1745, oil o/canvas Satirical humor full of moralizing intent Hogarth worked in series of painting, to be reproduced and distributed as prints Marriage à la mode: an indictment of both fashion fads and false pretense of Aristocracy Lord Squanderfield marriages a rich girl>a marriage “of convenience” Hogarth: Hogarth: Moralizing Satire Lord Squanderfield: an aristocrat without means Marries rich bride Here: marriage contract is drawn up; bride is already bored Lord Squanderfield points to his family tree Swollen foot: Syphilis (?); sexual dissipation Paintings on wall: indicate waste of money Hogarth: Hogarth: Moralizing Satire William Hogarth, Breakfast Scene, from Marriage à la mode series, c. 1745, oil o/canvas At 1:00 p.m., the couple is taking breakfast Squanderfield spent the night out in brothel (cap with dog sniffing at it) Hogarth: Hogarth: Moralizing Satire Mrs. Squanderfield killed time with music making and playing cards (idleness to be condemned) Household’s steward exits the scene with a stack of unpaid bills Erotic art in background underlines combination of waste and moral dissipation Tragic end of story: Lord dies in duel with wife’s lover; Mrs. Squanderfield dies in abject poverty Huber: Huber: Voltaire’s Neighbor Jean Huber, Voltaire’s Morning, 1760­ 1775, oil o/canvas Satire not only at home in GB, but also in Switzerland Voltaire: most famous of the philosophes Public face and consciousness of the Enlightenment, public figure Maintained vast correspondence with everybody who was anybody in the 18th century Atheist, but advocate for religious freedom; fought for rights of persecuted Protestants in France, for instance Huber: Huber: Voltaire’s Neighbor After 1759 Voltaire lived in exile in Switzerland, near Geneva Huber: Voltaire’s neighbor in CH Starts painting scenes from the aging philosopher’s daily life in his exile Specializes on satirical Voltaire portraits Huber: Huber: Voltaire’s Neighbor Huber’s Voltaire portraits become all the rage with Europe’s aristocracy Catherine the Great in Russia commissions a whole series from Huber Here: Voltaire gets up in the morning, jumps into his pants, while dictating already a letter to his secretary Huber: Huber: Voltaire’s Neighbor Jean Huber, Voltaire Playing Chess, 1764­1770, oil o/canvas Another Huber scene from Voltaire’s daily life Many important visitors to Voltaire’s Swiss estate Right: “Father Adam”: a renegade cleric from the Jesuit order housed by Voltaire out of sympathies for Father Adam’s support of Enlightenment ideas ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course AGRI 1001 taught by Professor Garrison during the Fall '08 term at LSU.

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