ARTHLecture3Part1

ARTHLecture3Part1 - ART 1441: ART 1441: Historical Survey...

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Unformatted text preview: ART 1441: ART 1441: Historical Survey of the Arts: Renaissance to Modern Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Outline Lecture 3 Outline Lecture 3 Humanism and the Renaissance Art in fifteenth­century City States: ­ Florence ­ Rome ­ Mantua ­ Urbino Humanism and the Renaissance Humanism and the Renaissance Learning during the Renaissance meant authors of Classical Antiquity: Plato, Socrates, Aristotle, Ovid, etc. “Pagan” authors; contrast to teaching of the Church Invention of printing press, Gutenberg 1445 (Germany) Vernacular literature: Dante’s Divine Comedy No longer Latin Humanism and the Renaissance Humanism Civic pride, civic responsibility Fame, honor, worldly accomplishments and riches; the here and now Contrast to Medieval mind set: otherworldly riches, the beyond Art patronage: merchants, trade, condotte (mercenaries) Model patron: Medici family of Florence Acquired wealth through banking, made Florence art center of Italy Gentile da Fabriano: Gentile da Fabriano: ‘International’ Style in Florence: Gentile da Fabriano: ‘International’ Style in Florence Gentile da Fabriano, Adoration of the Magi, Altarpiece for Santa Trinità, Florence, 1423, tempera o/wood Gothic tracery, splendor Costumes influenced by French art Iconography: Also French influence: chivalry Predella panels Foreshortening (horse) Idea of Foreshortening: Idea of Foreshortening: Adding Depth through Visual Contraction Massacio: Massacio: Master of Florentine Fresco Painting Massacio, Tribute Money, Brancacci Chapel, Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence, c. 1427, fresco Iconography: Gospel of Matthew>tribute money for tax collector found by St. Peter in the mouth of a fish; three episodes Massacio: Massacio: Master of Florentine Fresco Painting Private Commission: Felice Brancassi’s family chapel Commentary on the castato (Florentine income tax)? Classical drapery Chiaroscuro: Italian word meaning “light­dark”; refers to contrasts of light and dark tones in paintings, especially as used to suggest three­dimensional form Massacio: Massacio: Master of Florentine Fresco Painting Massacio: Massacio: Master of Florentine Fresco Painting Massacio, Expulsion of Adam and Eve from Eden, Brancacci Chapel, Santa Maria del Carmine, Florence, c. 1425, fresco Side panel in the same chapel Iconography: Genesis Vasari (first art historian): Massacio’s style “living, real, and natural” Genuine despair over the fall from sin Nude bodies modeled after ideals of beauty established in Classical Antiquity Massacio: Massacio: Master of Florentine Fresco Painting Massacio, Holy Trinity, Santa Maria Novella, Florence, c. 1428, fresco Iconography: Father, Son, and Holy Spirit (Dove); below Virgin Mary and St. John; kneeling donors (paid for decoration) Bottom: illusionistic (fake) tomb with skeleton Massacio: Massacio: Master of Florentine Fresco Painting Secret of Illusionistic Painting/ Invention of Perspective: The Single Vanishing Point An Example of Florentine Portrait An Example of Florentine Portrait Painting Domenico Ghirlandaio, Giovanna Toranbuoni (?), oil and tempera o/wood, 1488 Member of Florentine Albrizzi family Part of city’s oligarchy Rich embroidery, stiff profile pose Wealth, education of sitter is emphasized Ghirlandaio: Courtly Splendor Ghirlandaio: Courtly Splendor Domenico Ghirlandaio, Birth of the Virgin, Cappella Maggiore, Santa Maria Novella, Florence, 1485­1490, fresco A Biblical scene provides the pretext for the conspicuous display of splendor and wealth Patron: Giovanni Tornabuoni, one of the richest men in Florence Emphasis on crispness, facility in spatial rendering Fra Angelico: Fra Angelico: The Florentine Friar Painter Fra Angelico, Annunciation, San Marco Monastery, Florence, c. 1440­1445, fresco Fra Angelico: a friar (and painter) at the San Marco Monastery in Florence Illustration of 13th century text on how to pray (De modo orandi) Fra Angelico: Fra Angelico: The Florentine Friar Painter Masterwork of illusionism Loggia Three­dimensional space Chiaroscuro Classical drapery Fra Filippo Lippi: Fra Filippo Lippi: The Fallen Friar Fra Filippo Lippi, Madonna and Child with Angel, tempera o/wood, c. 1455 Another friar­painter from Florence Influenced by Masaccio Seduced a nun>disgrace Chubby, mischievous (?) putto (Angel) to the right The painter: a worldly man; even religious art during Renaissance, a worldly thing Andrea del Castagno: Andrea del Castagno: Last Supper in Florence Andrea del Castagno, Last Supper, Refectory of the Monastery of Sant’Apollonia, Florence, 1447, fresco Biblical Last Supper scene, commissioned for the Refectory (dining hall) of Sant’Apollonia Andrea del Castagno: Andrea del Castagno: Last Supper in Florence Another instance of a Biblical scene taken as a pretext to show splendor, wealth of Florentine society Three­dimensional space, imitation­marble panels (Classical Antiquity), Near Eastern chimeras, psychological introspection of drama Perugino: A fresco for the Sistine Perugino: A fresco for the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican Perugino, Christ Delivering the Keys of the Kingdom to Saint Peter, Sistine Chapel, Vatican, Rome, 1481­1483, fresco Papal patronage: Pope Sixtus IV Beautification program Vatican (1481­1483): Boticelli, Ghirlandaio, Luca Signorelli to work on Sistine chapel Perugino: A fresco for the Sistine Perugino: A fresco for the Sistine Chapel in the Vatican Event in foreground: founding myth of the Vatican One­point perspective for square in foreground Triumphal arches: after Arch of Constantine, Roman emperor who ended Christian persecution ...
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