ARTHLecture4Part1

ARTHLecture4Part1 - ARTH 1441 ARTH 1441 Historical Survey...

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Unformatted text preview: ARTH 1441: ARTH 1441: Historical Survey of the Arts: Renaissance to Modern Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Outline Lecture 4 Outline Lecture 4 Sculpture during the Proto­ Renaissance in Pisa Florence Baptistery Door Competition Renaissance Sculpture in Florence Architecture of the Florence Cathedral Renaissance Architecture in Florence and Mantua Nicolas Pisano: The Proto­ Nicolas Pisano: The Proto­ Renaissance in Sculpture (Pisa) Nicolas Pisano: The Proto­ Nicolas Pisano: The Proto­ Renaissance in Sculpture (Pisa) Nicolas Pisano, Pulpit of Pisa Cathedral Baptistery, Pisa, 1259­1260, Marble Mixture of Gothic (Medieval tracery) and Classical (Roman) sculptural elements Humanistic (classical) culture of Southern Italy (Sicily) may have been an influence Nicolas Pisano: The Proto­ Nicolas Pisano: The Proto­ Renaissance in Sculpture (Pisa) Left: Nicola Pisano, The Annunciation and the Nativity, Bas­relief from Pisa Cathedral Pulpit, 1259­1260, marble Right: Ara Pacis Augustae (Emperor Augustus’s Altar of Peace), Tellus (Pagan Fertility Goddess), 13 – 9 B.C., marble Typical example of a Roman bas­relief Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Competition for East Doors Baptistery of Florence Top: Filippo Brunelleschi, Sacrifice of Isaac, Competition Panel for East Doors, Baptistery of Florence Cathedral, Florence, 1401­1402, Gilded bronze relief Bottom: Lorenzo Ghiberti, Sacrifice of Isaac, Competition Panel for East Doors, Baptistery of Florence Cathedral, Florence, 1401­1402, Gilded bronze relief Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Competition for East Doors Baptistery of Florence 1401: Competition for east doors of Florence baptistery Sponsored by Wool Merchants’ Guild Submissions by two finalists, Brunelleschi and Ghiberti, survive Old Testament iconography: Sacrifice of Isaac Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Competition for East Doors Baptistery of Florence Both scenes: inserted into French Gothic quatrefoil pattern Different underlying aesthetic principles: Brunelleschi: more conservative, no experiments, maybe a touch of Gothic style; Ghiberti: drama, profound understanding of classical canon of the male nude, muscularity and Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Brunelleschi and Ghiberti: Competition for East Doors Baptistery of Florence Right: Roman copy of Doryphoros, example of canon of classical beauty in the art of Antiquity Ghiberti won the competition with his proposal Culture of humanism favored his approach Ghiberti: Ghiberti: ‘Gates of Paradise’ Lorenzo Ghiberti, Gates of Paradise, East Doors, Baptistery of Florence Cathedral, Florence, 1425­ 1452, Gilded bronze relief Ghiberti’s completed competition doors moved to south side; second set of doors commissioned Ghiberti: Ghiberti: ‘Gates of Paradise’ Michelangelo: “so beautiful […] they would do well for the Gates of Paradise” No longer quatrefoil pattern>rectangle Detail, panel: “Isaac and His Sons” Emphasis on single­point Perspective Relief flattens progressively from bottom to top Greater sense of depth Nanni di Banco: Nanni di Banco: Classically Rendered Saints in Florence Nanni di Banco, Four Crowned Saints, Or San Michele, Florence, c. 1408­1414, marble Or San Michele: Headquarter of the guilds in Florence, but also served one time as church Early 14th­century Building with niches for statuary to be filled by guilds Nanni di Banco: Nanni di Banco: Classically Rendered Saints in Florence Nanni di Banco given over the commission to fill the sculptures’ guild niche Patron saints: defied order by Emperor Diocletian to sculpt pagan idol>martyrdom Thoroughly classical figure group Nanni di Banco: Nanni di Banco: Classically Rendered Saints in Florence Figures are free­standing, not engaged with the wall Engaged sculptures: Medieval convention Classical drapery Physiognomy of classical Sculpture, Similar to Roman portraiture Nanni di Banco: Nanni di Banco: Classically Rendered Saints in Florence Donatello: Donatello: Saint Mark from Or San Michele Donatello, Saint Mark, Or San Michele, Florence, 1411­1413, marble Another sculpture for the niches of the Or San Michele by a different artist Commissioned by the guild of the linen drapers Donatello: Donatello: Saint Mark from Or San Michele Another example of a statue inspired by the art of Classical Antiquity: Drapery Classical convention of contrapposto (weight shift) Example: Kritios Boy, 490­480 B.C., marble (Ancient Greek) Donatello: Donatello: Siena Baptismal Fond Relief Donatello, Feast of Herod, from the baptismal font of Siena Cathedral, Siena, c. 1425, gilded bronze relief Fondness of perspectival rendering Aesthetically closer to Ghiberti Symmetrical rhythm, measure Donatello: Donatello: Siena Baptismal Fond Relief Iconography: Salome, still dancing (to the right) delivers severed head of St. John the Baptist to king Herod Animation, emotionalism Classical drapery ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course ARTH 1440 taught by Professor Camerlenghi during the Fall '11 term at LSU.

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