ARTHLecture7Part2

ARTHLecture7Part2 - Pollaiuolo Pollaiuolo Transition to the...

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Unformatted text preview: Pollaiuolo: Pollaiuolo: Transition to the High Renaissance in Sculpture Antonio Pollaiuolo, Hercules and Antaeus, c. 1475, bronze A small bronze commissioned by the Medici Hercules associated with the city of Florence (like a pagan patron saint) Emphasis on anatomical observations: strain of sinews, musculature Aesthetic occupation similar to Michelangelo’s Sistine ceiling Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Michelangelo Buonarroti, David, 1501­1504, marble Before starting Sistine ceiling, Michelangelo was mainly known as a sculptor David: the epitome of High Renaissance sculpture Commissioned by the Cathedral Building Committee in Florence Incredible feat: carved from a single, giant block of marble left over from previous building campaign Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Theme inspired by previous bronze sculptures by Donatello and Verrocchio Michelangelo’s concept very different: no adolescent, but a young Man: vigilant, self­assured; the moment of taking measure of the enemy before the battle (different psychological dimension) Political allegory David Florence need to be watchful A civic monument Michelangelo’s David in front of the Michelangelo’s Palazzo della Signoria, Florence Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work David was deeply influenced by the classical tradition of sculpture, especially depictions of the nude: Top Right: Lysippos Apoxyomenos (Scraper), c. 330 B.C. Bottom: Athanadoros, Hagesandros, Polydoros, Laocoon, 1st cent. B.C., marble Tense, muscular bodies, idealized proportions, heroic nudity rendered in white marble Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Michelangelo Buonarroti, Moses, San Pietro in Vincoli, c. 1513­ 1515, marble Pope Julius II also commissioned Michelangelo to design his tomb in 1505 Michelangelo’s design: Monument with 28 sculptures Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Central sculpture of the completed tomb: Moses Massive, bearded figure Classical drapery Holds Tablets of the Law Same type of muscular body as in the David Over life­size Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Michelangelo Buonarroti, Bound Slave, 1513­1516, marble Original tomb design: about 20 figures of so­called “slaves” Sculptures left in various states of finish Bound slave one of the few works near completion Visual appeal: struggle to shed the bondage Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Michelangelo Buonarroti, Tomb of Giuliano de’ Medici, New Sacristy (Medici Chapel), San Lorenzo, Florence, 1519­1534, marble Commissioned by Medici Pope Clement VII, also remained unfinished Classical façade as backdrop; design with niche for sculpture of Giuliano de’ Medici in Roman armor River gods on sarcophagi Pendant tomb of Lorenzo de’ Medici (following slide: right) Michelangelo Revisited: Michelangelo Revisited: The Sculptural Work Bramante: Bramante: Plans for New St. Peter’s Bramante, Ground Plan for New St. Peter’s, Vatican, Rome, 1505; Medal with Bramante’s design (1506) in relation to Pantheon Pope Julius II ambitious building Program: build a new St. Peter’s Cathedral Bramante drew plans for a gigantic structure; highly regular ground plan of nine interlocking crosses and a large cupola Only a small part of the plan was realized; Michelangelo to design most of present­day St. Peter’s Bramante: Bramante: The Tempietto Bramante, Tempietto, San Pietro in Montorio, Rome, c. 1502 A structure that Bramante designed and completed Inspiration: round temples from Classical Antiquity (see Temple of Vestal Virgins) Bramante liked the idea of regularity inherent in the plan of a round structure Bramante: Bramante: The Tempietto Sangallo: Sangallo: Classical Regularity Antonio da Sangallo, Farnese Palace, Rome, c. 1530­1546. Sangallo was student of Bramante’s Designed the Palace for Cardinal Farnese, future Pope Paul III, in Rome Perpetuates the idea of highly regular façade built after classical themes Symmetry, regularity, simplicity (no decorations, except for rusticated corners Aesthetic ideas influenced design LSU campus Sangallo: Sangallo: Classical Regularity Plan of building governed by the same regularity Building arranged around a central courtyard Refinement of orders as one goes up: Tuscan, Ionic, Corinthian Bramante’s ideas realized Michelangelo Michelangelo as an Architect Michelangelo Buonarroti, Design of Capitoline Hill (Campidoglio), Rome, c. 1537 Pope Paul III asked Michelangelo to re­ design the central square of Capitoline Hill in 1537 (same time as M. painted Last Judgment in Sistine chapel) Existing buildings needed to be integrated: Palazzo dei Senatori (back); Michelangelo added stairs New: regular pavement design Center: Roman sculpture of Marcus Aurelius (moved for this purpose; thought Michelangelo Michelangelo as an Architect Michelangelo Buonarroti, Museo Capitolino, Rome, c. 1537 Two lateral buildings of the Capioline square designed from scratch by Michelangelo Regular design, aesthetic Michelangelo Michelangelo as an Architect Michelangelo Buonarroti, Saint Peter’s, Vatican, Rome, 1546­ 1564 In 1546 Paul III asked Michelangelo to complete the design and construction of New St. Peter’s (project abandoned by Bramante) Michelangelo simplified Bramante’s central plan: Michelangelo Michelangelo as an Architect Greek cross plan with lateral chapels Façade rhythmical, ornate, yet highly regular with Corinthian pilasters Stylistically, marks transition to Mannerist/ Baroque architecture Cupola finished late by another architect named Giacomo della Porta ...
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