ARTHLecture8Part2-1

ARTHLecture8Part2-1 - Romano: Romano: Mannerism translated...

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Unformatted text preview: Romano: Romano: Mannerism translated to architecture Giulio Romano, Palazzo del Tè (interior courtyard), Mantua, 1525­1535 Duke Frederigo Gonzaga commissioned Romano to design his country estate near Mantua Complex originally used as stables; later expanded to become a pleasure palace View: interior courtyard Romano: Romano: Mannerism translated to architecture Ironic play with the conventions of classical architecture; design is full of surprises Heavily rusticated masonry (excessively rusticated) Regularity; aesthetics of geometry and measure (High Renaissance) disrupted Sliding triglyphs: appear to be crashing on the passerby Protruding keystones Impression: a massive palace on Romano: Romano: Mannerism translated to architecture Giulio Romano, Fall of the Giants, Palazzo del Tè, Mantua, 1524­1536, fresco Impression perpetuated in the interior with illusionistic ceiling paintings also by Romano Heaven upheld by Tintoretto: Tintoretto: Mannerism in Venice Tintoretto, Last Supper, San Giorgio Maggiore, Venice, 1594, oil o/canvas Infused sense of spiritual drama into the Last Supper iconography Supernatural and agitated scene: radiant haloes, chiaroscuro effects, ghost­like angels, body language and poses of Mannerist art Tintoretto: Tintoretto: Mannerism in Venice Comparison with Leonardo da Vinci reveals just how much Tintoretto has left behind High Renaissance aesthetics Lack of symmetry, order, ambiguous space Veronese: Veronese: Mannerism as Venetian Luxury Style Paolo Veronese, Christ in the House of Levi, 1573, oil o/canvas Veronese loved to paint on monumental scale (length: more than 18 feet) Iconography completely made up; composition was planned as a Last Supper scene Veronese: Veronese: Mannerism as Venetian Luxury Style Scene takes place under a splendid loggia Venice’s gilded oligarchy is in attendance A society event for upper­ class Inquisition of the Catholic Church took offense to picture Imposed changes; Veronese simply changed the title (no longer a Last Supper), but Christ in the House of Levi Veronese: Veronese: Mannerism as Venetian Luxury Style Paolo Veronese, Triumph of Venice, Ceiling of the Hall of the Grand Council, Palazzo Ducale, Venice, c. 1585, oil o/canvas Civic virtue ran high in Venice (often higher than religious feelings) Expressed in terms of art and architecture Veronese: Veronese: Mannerism as Venetian Luxury Style Ceiling painting for the seat of the Venetian government in the Palazzo Ducale (Doge’s palace) Di sotto in sù effect (looking from below upwards) Female personification of Venice crowned amidst clouds, fantasy architecture, twisted columns, military heroes, Venetian upper­class, lion of St. Mark Highly agitated scene, sumptuous festivity Sansovino: Sansovino: Architect of Venice Jacopo Sansovino, The Mint (La Zecca) and the State Library, Venice, 1535­1545 Influenced by Bramante; arrived in Venice after the sack of Rome in 1527 Architectural principles of High Renaissance with an extra touch of exuberance Sansovino: Sansovino: Architect of Venice Sansovino built the Mint (La Zecca) of Venice (commercial power house; Venetian coins circulated widely), library added later on Street level: gallery with shops; heavy, Tuscan­style columns “Lighter” Ionic style for second floor Entablature: putti faces, festoons Mannerist touch: sculptures, obelisk on roof balustrade Palladio: Palladio: A Venetian Architectural Style Andrea Palladio, Villa Rotunda (formerly Villa Capra), near Vicenza, c. 1566­1570 After Sansovino’s death (1580): Palladio official architect of the Venetian Republic Architectural theorist (Four Books on Architecture) Invents his own style based on classical architectural models Palladio: Palladio: A Venetian Architectural Style Palladio rose to fame with the construction of villas for rich Venetians on the mainland, near Brenta River>re­invented the villa 19 villas by Palladio still exist Roman tradition: otium (leisure) of country farm to balance negotium (business) of city life Centralized, highly regular plan; rotunda building with classical temple facade Palladio: Palladio: A Venetian Architectural Style Andrea Palladio, San Giorgio Maggiore (West façade), Venice, begun 1565 Major work in church architecture Palladio chose a classical temple façade for church across the lagoon from Ducal Palace Sculptures on pediment, niches Highly symmetrical; airiness, serenity of style Palladio: Palladio: A Venetian Architectural Style Andrea Palladio, San Giorgio Maggiore (Interior), Venice, begun 1565 Interior more appropriate for classical temple than for church Daylight filters in from above Pervasive use of classical architectural elements Transition to Baroque style in Da Ponte: Da Ponte: The Rialto Bridge Competition Antonio da Ponte, Rialto Bridge, Venice, completed 1591 Major architectural project of the end of the 16th century: permanent structure for Rialto bridge at the commercial center of city 1587: Competition launched Won by Antonio da Ponte>bridge still in place today, with shops located on it, view over Gand Canal Essentially, a Late Renaissance structure with regular arcades, rusticated masonry; engineering feat Da Ponte: Da Ponte: The Rialto Bridge Competition Other competitors included Michelangelo (design/ competition entry lost), Vicenzo Scamozzi (top), Palladio (bottom) Palladio’s classicism did not win the day Venetians preferred architecture that appeared light ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2012 for the course ARTH 1440 taught by Professor Camerlenghi during the Fall '11 term at LSU.

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