CLASSICAL PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIAL CLASS

CLASSICAL PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIAL CLASS - time ended,...

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SOCIAL CLASS IN THE UNITED STATES CLASSICAL PERSPECTIVES ON SOCIAL CLASS Karl Marx — Classes are social groups organized around property, and the ruling class to maintain its power enforces social stratification--class struggle between the bourgeoisie and the proletariat—exploitation is the key concept, creating alienation— class struggle—also noted the relationship between people’s social location in the class structure and their values, beliefs and behavior” (p. 276) AKA conditions create consciousness—Marx also proved that classes have opposing, rather than complimentary, interests The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles. Freeman and slave, patrician and plebian, lord and serf, guild-master and journeyman, in a word, oppressor and oppressed, stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, a fight that each
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Unformatted text preview: time ended, either in a revolutionary reconstitution of society at large, or in the common ruin of the contending classes. In the earlier epochs of history, we find almost everywhere a complicated arrangement of society into various orders, a manifold gradation of social rank. In ancient Rome we have patricians, knights, plebians, slaves; in the Middle Ages, feudal lords, vassals, guild-masters, journeymen, apprentices, serfs; in almost all of these classes, again, subordinate gradations. The modern bourgeois society that has sprouted from the ruins of feudal society has not done away with class antagonisms. It has but established new classes, new conditions of oppression, new forms of struggle in place of the old ones. Opening page of The Communist Manifesto (1848)...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2012 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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