Steven M - because they do not necessarily accompany a course of action— 3 Why do people act collectively rather than individually?—strength in

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COLLECTIVE BEHAVIOR, SOCIAL MOVEMENTS, AND SOCIAL CHANGE Steven M. Beuchler (2000) claimed that early sociologists studied collective behavior because they lived in a world that was responding to modernization, including urbanization, proletarianization of workers so it was new and different to them—tried to distinguish between frame analysis and social movement theory Collective activity occurs as a result of a common stimulus—a collectivity is a group of people who act together and may mutually transcend, bypass or subvert established institutional patterns and structures—often part of a breakdown of social control mechanisms Basic questions: 1. How do people transcend, bypass or subvert established institutional patterns and structures?--protests cannot make their point otherwise—communications make collective actions easier, so that being in a common location is no longer necessary 2. How do people’s attitudes compare with their actions? –surveys are misleading
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Unformatted text preview: because they do not necessarily accompany a course of action— 3. Why do people act collectively rather than individually?—strength in numbers and a belief in greater power—a collective response is more than the sum of individual actions Crowd —relatively large group of people in a limited physical area--marginally have a common purpose (to see a concert or movie) Mass —a crowd with a common purpose, though Kendall claims they do not need to be in each other’s immediate physical vicinity—like bloggers--similar to a “ rumor ” which doesn’t require people to be close, as a riot does—the dominant emotion , according to John Lofland , is “the publicly expressed feeling perceived by participants and observers as the most prominent episode of collective behavior.”(1993)—he claims that fear, hostility and joy and the three fundamental emotions found in collective behavior—Kendall adds shame, disgust, surprise or grief 1...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2012 for the course SCIE SYG2000 taught by Professor Bernhardt during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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