Acharnians Part_1

Acharnians Part_1 - Hercules in New York Thursday, 2...

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Thursday, 2 February, in Prescott 234 at 6:00 Sponsored by the LSU Classical Studies program, Students for the Promotion of Antiquity, and Eta Sigma Phi. FREE ADMISSION! Would we dare to charge for this? Hercules in New York
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Aristophanes’ birthdate based on line in Clouds [see Meineck/Storey p. xii] c. 450 will do as a date Accused of being a non-citizen, but that was a common attack
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Grows up during “golden age” of Periclean Athens Delian League Prosperity
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Power of Athens leads to resentment and war First Peloponnesian War 447/6 caused by revolt of Athenian “allies” 431 Athenian bullying of “allies” and Spartan distrust of Athenian power led to better known Peloponnesian War The war lasted, with an occasional interruption, from 431 to 404
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Pericles sets Athenian strategy: Move population within the Long Walls; use navy to attack Peloponnesus In addition to losses in combat, Athens lost about a third of its population to a plague in 429
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Spartans devastate Attic countryside Spartan hope is that the Athenains will come out to fight them
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Especially targeted is the deme of Acharnae
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The reason why Archidamus remained in order of battle at Acharnae during this incursion, instead of descending into the plain, is said to have been this. He hoped that the Athenians might possibly be tempted by the multitude of their youth and the unprecedented efficiency of their service to come out to battle and attempt to stop the devastation of their lands. Accordingly, as they had met him at Eleusis or the Thriasian plain, he tried if they could be provoked to a sally by the spectacle of a camp at Acharnae. He thought the place itself a good position for encamping ; and it seemed likely that such an important part of the state as the three thousand heavy infantry of the Acharnians would refuse to submit to the ruin of their property, and would force a battle on the rest of the citizens . . . . . . But when they [the Athenians] saw the army at Acharnae, barely seven miles from Athens, they lost all patience. The territory of Athens was being ravaged before the very eyes of the Athenians, a sight which the young men had never seen before and the old only in the Median [Persian] wars; and it was naturally thought a grievous insult, and the determination was universal, especially among the young men, to sally forth and stop it. Knots were formed in the streets and engaged in hot discussion; for if the proposed sally was warmly recommended, it was also in some cases opposed. Oracles of the most various import were recited by the collectors, and found eager listeners in one or other of the disputants. Foremost in pressing for the sally were the Acharnians , as constituting no small part of the army of the state, and as it was their land that was being ravaged. In short, the whole city was in a most excited state ; Pericles was the object of general indignation; his previous counsels were totally forgotten; he was abused for not leading out the army which he commanded, and was made responsible for the whole of the public suffering. He, meanwhile
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course CLST 3040 taught by Professor Major during the Fall '09 term at LSU.

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Acharnians Part_1 - Hercules in New York Thursday, 2...

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