ch. 1,2,3

Ch 1,2,3 - HUEC 4041 History of Textiles Part I Chapters 1 2 3 Weaving Tapestry Rug Weaving Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff Ph.D Doris Jules Carville

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HUEC 4041 History of Textiles Part I, Chapters 1, 2, 3: Weaving Tapestry Rug Weaving Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff, Ph.D. Doris & Jules Carville Professor
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Chapter 1: Weaving Woven construction consists of 2 sets of elements (yarns/threads) interlaced to form a cloth/fabric Warp (lenghtwise) held under tension parallel to each other Weft (crosswise) worked over and under warps row by row, side to side
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Weaving Most universal fabric construction method well developed by 6000 BC interlaced basketry (stiff elements) predates fabric woven from flexible yarns non-interlaced fabric structures (e.g. twining) predates woven fabrics
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Weaving Three basic operations some of warp threads lifted to form a shed (triangular space) weft (often carried on a shuttle) is passed through the shed weft is beaten of packed with a comb (reed) Gillow 1999 p 68
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Simple Weaves Plain weaves simplest and most universal weave (tabby) weft past over and under every-other warp variety through color, spacing, texture of yarns repp - warp faced construction tapestry - weft faced construction basket weave - warps and wefts are used in multiple sets (often paired)
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Simple Weaves Balanced plain weave (tabby) Warp-faced plain weave (repp) Weft-faced plain weave (tapestry) Gillow 1999 p 70, 78,81
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Simple Weaves Twill weaves characterized by pronounced diagonal movement weft goes over or under more than one warp even sided, reversible twills - (2/2) warp & weft counts roughly the same uneven twills - (3/1, 1/3) warp faced, weft faced; denim is warp faced herringbone & diamond twills formed if direction of the diagonal is changed 2/1 twill Gillow, 1999 p 73
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Twill Weaves Gillow 1999 p 72 Tartan plaids, twill weave Harris tweed, herringbone
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Satin weaves distinguished by spacing of binding points over 1, under 4 (or more) warp-faced weave warps float on top of the wefts weft-faced satins or sateen over 4 (or more), under 1 requires at least a 5-shaft loom Damask - pattern weaves formed by combining warp and weft floats Simple Weaves Gillow 1999 p 74, 82 Damask Satin
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Satin Weave in Silk Satin weave for silk, with 16 warp yarns floating over each weft yarn
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Sateen in Cotton An example of cotton sateen fabric, used to line a cloak.
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Damask Italian silk polychrome damasks, 14th century. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:ItalianSilkDamask.jpg
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Compound Weaves Compounded by adding sets of elements Supplementary sets can be removed without destroying the base fabric Complementary sets cannot be removed without destroying the fabric Compounded by combining complete weave structures Interconnected Integrated
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Compound Weaves Supplementary warp weaves Velvet Supplementary weft weaves Brocading Continuous Discontinuous Pile or boucle formed by additional wefts drawn up in loops
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Velvet Supplementary warp introduced over series
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course HUEC 4041 taught by Professor Kuttruff during the Fall '10 term at LSU.

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Ch 1,2,3 - HUEC 4041 History of Textiles Part I Chapters 1 2 3 Weaving Tapestry Rug Weaving Jenna Tedrick Kuttruff Ph.D Doris Jules Carville

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