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Young - Young's Experiment The macroscopic result of the...

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Young's Experiment The macroscopic result of the interference term is that interfering sources create a pattern of varying brightness on an appropriately placed screen. This may be caused either by the two sources being out-of-phase with one another or by the two sources traversing paths of different lengths to a particular point on the screen. Path lengths that vary by amounts of the order of a fraction of the wavelength of the light cause arriving waves to be out-of-phase with one another (for example if the path lengths of in- phase sources differ by λ /2 a peak will arrive with a trough and destructive interference will result) and interfere. The light and dark zones created by an two of more interfering waves are called fringes. One of the simplest and most important examples of this effect is an experiment, first performed by Thomas Young in 1805 to prove that light had a wave nature. He shined sunlight through a
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