Definition of Work

Definition of Work - Definition of Work Work, though easily...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Definition of Work Work, though easily defined mathematically, takes some explanation to grasp conceptually. In order to build an understanding of the concept, we begin with the most simple situation, then generalize to come up with the common formula. The General Case In the last section we came up with a definition of work given that the force acted in the same direction as the displacement of the particle. How do we calculate work if this is not the case? We simply resolve the force into components parallel and perpendicular to the direction of displacement of the particle (see Vectors, Component Method ). Only the force parallel to the displacement does work on the particle. Thus, if a force is applied at an angle θ to the displacement of the particle, the resulting work is defined by: W = ( F cos θ ) x This new equation has similar form to the old equation, but provides a more complete description. If θ = 0 , then cos θ = 1 and we have our first equation. Also, this equation ensures
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course PHY PHY2053 taught by Professor Davidjudd during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

Page1 / 2

Definition of Work - Definition of Work Work, though easily...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online