Introduction to Newton

Introduction to Newton - something, push something or...

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Introduction to Newton's Three Laws Newton's Three Laws, named after Sir Isaac Newton, who derived the laws, provide the basis for the study of Dynamics, and describe the fundamental laws of motion. These three laws will serve as a springboard for all other topics concerning dynamics. Mathematically, the laws can be written as the following: First Law: If F = 0 then a = 0 and v = constant Second Law: F = ma Third Law: F AB = - F BA We will spend the nest three section of this SparkNote examining the ideas behind Newton's Three Laws, and explaining the derivation of their mathematical formulas. Definition of a Force Since force is the fundamental concept of Dynamics, we must give a clear definition of this concept before we proceed with Newton's Laws. A force is defined (very practically) as a push or a pull. Of course, we experience forces all the time in everyday lives. Whenever we lift
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Unformatted text preview: something, push something or otherwise manipulate other objects, we are exerting a force. A force is a vector quantity, as it has both a magnitude and a direction. Let us show vector quality of a force practically: when exerting a force, for example pushing a crate, we can change the magnitude of our force by pushing harder or softer. We can also change the direction of our force, as we can push it one way or another. Since a force is a vector, all the rules of vector addition and subtraction, seen in Vectors apply. The vector quality of force allows us to manipulate forces in exactly the same way we manipulated velocity and acceleration in Kinematics. With a formal definition of force, we can now examine its relation to motion through Newton's laws....
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