Motion with Constant Acceleration in Two and Three Dimensions

Motion with Constant Acceleration in Two and Three Dimensions

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Motion with Constant Acceleration in Two and Three Dimensions We have already seen that motion in more than one dimension that undergoes constant acceleration is given by the vector equation: x ( t ) = a t 2 + v 0 t + x 0 , where a , v 0 and x 0 are constant vectors denoting the acceleration, intitial velocity, and initial position, respectively. Our next task will be to analyze special cases of this equation that describe important examples of two- and three-dimensional motion with constant acceleration: mainly, we will study projectile motion. Projectile Motion Simply stated, projectile motion is just the motion of an object near the earth's surface which experiences acceleration only due to the earth's gravitational pull. In the section on one- dimensional motion with constant acceleration , we learned that this acceleration is given by g = 9.8 m/s 2 . Using a three-dimensional coordinate system, with the z -axis pointing upwards to the sky, the corresponding acceleration vector becomes a = (0, 0, -
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Motion with Constant Acceleration in Two and Three Dimensions

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