Units of Power - Units of Power The unit of power is the...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Units of Power The unit of power is the joule per second, which is more commonly called a watt. Another unit commonly used to measure power, especially in everyday situations, is the horsepower, which is equivalent to about 746 Watts. The rate at which our automobiles do work is measured in horsepower. Power, unlike work or energy, is not really a "building block" for further studies in physics. We do not derive other concepts from our understanding of power. It is far more applicable for practical use with machinery that delivers force. That said, power remains an important and useful concept in classical mechanics, and often comes up in physics courses. Calculus Based Section: Variable Forces So far we have looked at the work done by a constant force. In the physical world, however, this often is not the case. Consider a mass moving back and forth on a spring. As the spring gets stretched or compressed it exerts more force on the mass. Thus the force exerted by the spring is dependent on the position of the particle. We will examine how to calculate work by a position
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 2

Units of Power - Units of Power The unit of power is the...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online