The Pendulum - The Pendulum Another common oscillation is...

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The Pendulum Another common oscillation is that of the simple pendulum. The classic pendulum consists of a particle suspended from a light cord. When the particle is pulled to one side and released, it swings back past the equilibrium point and oscillates between two maximum angular displacements. It is clear that the motion is periodic--we want to see if it is simple harmonic. We do so by drawing a free body diagram and examining the forces on the pendulum at any given time. Figure %: A simple pendulum with cord of length L , shown with free body diagram at a displacement of θ from the equilibrium point The two forces acting on the pendulum at any given time are tension from the rope and gravity. At the equilibrium point the two are antiparallel and cancel exactly, satisfying our condition that there must be no net force at the equilibrium point. When the pendulum is displaced by an angle θ , the gravitational force must be resolved into radial and tangential components. The radial
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course PHY PHY2053 taught by Professor Davidjudd during the Fall '10 term at Broward College.

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The Pendulum - The Pendulum Another common oscillation is...

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