Labor Demand and Finding Equilibrium

Labor Demand and Finding Equilibrium - unit of labor isn't...

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Labor Demand and Finding Equilibrium Labor Demand The firms who sold goods and services in the unit on supply and demand now become the buyers in the labor market. Firms need workers to make products, design those products, package them, sell them, advertise for them, ship them, and distribute them, among other tasks. No worker will do this for free, and so firms must enter into the labor market and buy labor. Firms determine the amount of labor that they demand according to several considerations: how much the labor will cost (as represented by the market wage), and how much they feel they need, much in the way that buyers in the goods and services market buy according to the market price and their own needs. Marginal Revenue Product Firms are willing to buy labor up to the point where the marginal revenue product of labor is equal to the market wage. What does this mean? The marginal revenue product is the extra revenue a firm generates when they buy one more unit of input (in this case, the input is labor: a
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Unformatted text preview: unit of labor isn't a new employee, it's another unit of work; an example would be an additional hour of work). As long as the income generated by extra hours of work balances (or exceeds) the wages paid for those extra hours of work, firms will be willing to pay for more labor. If the marginal revenue product (MRP) of labor is equal to the market wage, the firms will be at their optimal point of labor consumption, since buying more labor would mean that the MRP is less than the wage, and buying less labor would mean that the MRP is greater than the wage. If the marginal revenue product of labor is less than the market wage, then the firms are using too much labor, and those firms will probably cut back on the hours they buy until the MRP of labor is equal to the wage. MRP > w : The firm will buy more labor MRP = w : The firm is buying the right amount of labor MRP < w : The firm is buying too much labor...
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2012 for the course ECO ECO2013 taught by Professor Jominy during the Fall '08 term at Broward College.

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