Integration with variables Notes_Part_16

Integration with variables Notes_Part_16 - 15 30 Figure...

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Unformatted text preview: 15 30 Figure 7.29. Fluid Flow Past a Tilted Plate. Note that = (1 , 0 ), and hence this flow satisfies the Neumann boundary conditions (7.95) on the horizontal segment D = . The corresponding complex potential is ( z ) = z , with complex velocity f ( z ) = ( z ) = 1. Example 7.41. Circular disk . Recall that the Joukowski conformal map = g ( z ) = 1 2 parenleftbigg z + 1 z parenrightbigg (7 . 96) squashes the unit circle | z | = 1 down to the real line segment [ 1 , 1] in the plane. Therefore, it will map the fluid flow outside a unit disk to the fluid flow past the line segment, which, according to the previous example, has complex potential ( ) = . The resulting complex potential is ( z ) = g ( z ) = g ( z ) = 1 2 parenleftbigg z + 1 z parenrightbigg . (7 . 97) Except for a factor of 1 2 , indicating that the corresponding flow past the disk is half as fast, this agrees with the potential we derived in Example 7.17. Example 7.42. Tilted plate . Let us next consider the case of a tilted plate in a uniformly horizontal fluid flow. Thus, the cross-section is the line segment z ( t ) = te i , 1 t 1 , obtained by rotating the horizontal line segment [ 1 , 1] through an angle , as in Figure 7.29. The goal is to construct a fluid flow past the tilted segment that is asymptotically horizontal at large distance....
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Integration with variables Notes_Part_16 - 15 30 Figure...

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