lect-06 - CS/ECE 438 1 Internetworking: Switching and...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: CS/ECE 438 1 Internetworking: Switching and Routing ECE/CS 438 Fall 2011 Slides from Peterson & Davies Outline n Switching and Bridging Datagram switching Virtual Circuits Source Routing n Basic Internetworking (IP) n Routing Goal n Understanding the functions of switches, bridges and routers n Detail the Internet Protocol (IP) for interconnecting networks of arbitrary size n Understanding the concept of routing and how it works and scales Switching and Forwarding n Store-and-Forward Switches n Bridges and Extended LANs n Cell Switching(ATM) n Segmentation and Reassembly Switching and Forwarding n Switch A mechanism that allows us to interconnect links to form a large network A multi-input, multi-output device which transfers packets from an input to one or more outputs Switching and Forwarding Adds the star topology to the point-to-point link, bus (Ethernet), and ring (802.5 and FDDI) topologies Switching and Forwarding Properties of this star topology Even though a switch has a fixed number of inputs and outputs, which limits the number of hosts that can be connected to a single switch, large networks can be built by interconnecting a number of switches We can connect switches to each other and to hosts using point-to-point links, which typically means that we can build networks of large geographic scope Adding a new host to the network by connecting it to a switch does not necessarily mean that the hosts already connected will get worse performance from the network Switching and Forwarding The last claim cannot be made for the shared media networks like Etherrnet and wireless 802.11 It is impossible for two hosts on the same Ethernet to transmit continuously at 10Mbps because they share the same transmission medium Every host on a switched network has its own link to the switch n So it may be possible for many hosts to transmit at the full link speed (bandwidth) provided that the switch is designed with enough aggregate capacity Switching and Forwarding n A switch is connected to a set of links and for each of these links, runs the appropriate data link protocol to communicate with that node n A switch ` s primary job is to receive incoming packets on one of its links and to transmit them on some other link This function is referred as switching and forwarding According to OSI architecture this is the main function of the network layer Switching and Forwarding n How does the switch decide which output port to place each packet on? It looks at the header of the packet for an identifier that it uses to make the decision Two common approaches n Datagram or Connectionless approach n Virtual circuit or Connection-oriented approach A third approach source routing is less common Switching and Forwarding n Assumptions Each host has a globally unique address There is some way to identify the input and output ports of each switch n We can use numbers n We can use names Switching and Forwarding n Datagrams...
View Full Document

Page1 / 117

lect-06 - CS/ECE 438 1 Internetworking: Switching and...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online