MSmithIndividSicCel

MSmithIndividSicCel - Sickle Cell Anemia Project...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Sickle Cell Anemia Project Computational Molecular Biology by Michael Smith
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
_______________________________________________________________________ _ Step 1 : Obtain an overview of sickle cell anemia The first step of this project involved obtaining an overview of sickle cell anemia and in the process familiarizing myself with the condition. By performing a Google (www.google.com) search with the key words sickle cell anemia , I came across the websites of the The Sickle Cell Information Center at Emory University (www.scinfo.org) and The Sickle Cell Disease Association of America (http://www.sicklecelldisease.org). Both sites contain a wealth of information, about sickle cell anemia, and relevant exerts are presented below. _______________________________________________________________________ _ Sickle Cell Anemia Overview Sickle cell disease is an inherited blood disorder that affects red blood cells. People with sickle cell disease have red blood cells that contain mostly hemoglobin* S, an abnormal type of hemoglobin. Sometimes these red blood cells become sickle-shaped (crescent shaped) and have difficulty passing through small blood vessels. When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, less blood can reach that part of the body. Tissue that does not receive a normal blood flow eventually becomes damaged. This is what causes the complications of sickle cell disease. There is currently no universal cure for sickle cell disease. Hemoglobin is the main substance of the red blood cell. It helps red blood cells carry oxygen from the air in our lungs to all parts of the body. Normal red blood cells contain hemoglobin A. Hemoglobin S and hemoglobin C are abnormal types of hemoglobin. Normal red blood cells are soft and round and can squeeze through tiny blood tubes (vessels). Normally, red blood cells live for about 120 days before new ones replace them.
Background image of page 2
People with sickle cell conditions make a different form of hemoglobin A called hemoglobin S (S stands for sickle). Red blood cells containing mostly hemoglobin S do not live as long as normal red blood cells (normally about 16 days). They also become stiff, distorted in shape and have difficulty passing through the body’s small blood vessels. When sickle-shaped cells block small blood vessels, less blood can reach that part of the body. Tissue that does not receive a normal blood flow eventually becomes damaged. This is what causes the complications of sickle cell disease. You inherit the abnormal hemoglobin from your parents, who may be carriers with sickle cell trait or parents with sickle cell disease. You can not catch it. You are born with the sickle cell hemoglobin and it is present for life. If you inherit only one sickle gene, you have sickle cell trait. If you inherit two sickle cell genes you have sickle cell disease. Sickle cell trait is a person who carries one sickle hemoglobin producing gene
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/10/2012 for the course CSE 5615 taught by Professor Mitra during the Fall '11 term at FIT.

Page1 / 16

MSmithIndividSicCel - Sickle Cell Anemia Project...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online