Ch0-Introduction

Ch0-Introduction - Digital State Machines Introduction...

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Digital State Machines Introduction
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2/11/12 Veton Këpuska 2 Introduction u Introduction to Digital State Machines n Brief History u Required Skills – Data Structures and  Algorithms
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2/11/12 Veton Këpuska 3 Course Outline u Introduction u u Deterministic Finite State Machines u Non-Deterministic Finite State Machines u Regular Expressions and Languages u Context Free Grammars and Languages u Properties of Context-Free Languages u Introduction to Turing Machines
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Introduction to Automata
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Brief History – Early Days u Automata theory is the study of abstract computing  devices. u Before advent of computers in 1930’s, Allan Turing  studied an abstract machine with capabilities of  today’s computers. n Goal to describe the boundaries of u What a computing device can do, and u What that computing device can not do. u Turing conclusions apply not only to his abstract  machines but to today’s real computers. 2/11/12 Veton Këpuska 5
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u Simpler machines – “finite automata” were studied. n Models of brain functions were proposed  n Useful for variety of other purposes u MIT’s Chomsky began the study of formal “grammars” n Formal grammars have a close relationships to abstract  automata  n They are basis of important parts of software including  compilers. 2/11/12 Veton Këpuska 6
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2/11/12 Veton Këpuska 7 Language, Thought and Turing Test u To many, the ability of computers to process language as skillfully as we  humans do will signal the arrival of truly intelligent machines. The basis of this  belief is the fact that the effective use of language is intertwined with our  general cognitive abilities. u Among the first to consider the computational implications of this intimate  connection was Alan Turing (1950). In this famous paper,  http://www.turing.org.uk/publications/testbook.html http://www.abelard.org/turpap/turpap.php: Turing, A. (1950) “Computing Machinery and Intelligence”  Mind  59, 236, 433-60  Turing introduced what has come to be known as the  Turing Test . Turing  began with the thesis that the question of what it would mean for a machine to think  was essentially unanswerable due to the inherent imprecision in the terms  machine  and  think . Instead, he suggested an empirical test, a game, in which a computer’s  use of language would form the basis for determining if it could think. If the machine  could win the game it would be judged intelligent.
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2/11/12 Veton Këpuska 8 Language, Thought and Turing Test u In Turing’s game, there are three participants:  n two people, and  n a computer.  u One of the people is a contestant and plays the role of an interrogator. 
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2012 for the course ECE 3541 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '10 term at FIT.

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Ch0-Introduction - Digital State Machines Introduction...

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