Chapter 3

Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: Theatre and Culture 14/05/2010...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 3: Theatre and Culture 14/05/2010 01:16:00 Theatre of the people is where artists outside the dominant culture express themselves - Augusto Boal called it theatre of the oppressed Theatre has been controlled by the dominant culture through racism, sexism, discrimination, economic power, and social and religious customs Theatre of the people attempts to give a voice to all members of society as it increases multiculturalism and reduces stereotyping Three types of Theatre of the people: Theatre of identity promotes a particular peoples cultural identity as it strengthens the bonds of the community Theatre of protest objects to the dominant cultures control as it demands that a minority cultures voice and political agenda be heard Cross-culture theatre mixes different cultures in an attempt to find understanding of commonality among cultures Theatre of people attempts to lessen the conflict of ethnocentrism by raising cultural consciousness of audiences. Government organizations (ex: National Endowment for the Arts) try to promote culture understanding by funding art created by non-mainstream cultures and allowing all voices to be heard Theatre of the people attempts to correct the biases and address the stereotypes rather than reflecting the dominant culture Willis Richardson was the first black playwright to have a play on Broadway that was not a musical- The Chip Womans Fortune Lorraine Hansberry was the first black woman playwright to be produced on Broadway. (1959) Ethnocentrism : when we see the world from a certain point of view, through our culture, and think that it is the correct view. Chapter 4: Experiencing and Analyzing Plays 14/05/2010 01:16:00 Even though each member of the audience is unique, when they join together in a group, there are forces at work that can change how they feel and react. These forces include: Group dynamics Suspension of disbelief Aesthetic distance Some plays require you to be active, and others require you to sit quietly in the dark Depending on the type of play you see, the rules of etiquette change, and this ranges from behavior to wardrobe...
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Chapter 3 - Chapter 3: Theatre and Culture 14/05/2010...

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