Ch0-Introduction

Ch0-Introduction - ECE-5527 Speech Recognition Introduction...

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Unformatted text preview: ECE-5527 Speech Recognition Introduction to Automatic Speech Recognition Lecture notes adopted from MIT Lectures 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 2 Introduction to Speech Recognition u Introduction to ASR n Problem definition n State of the art examples u Course overview n Lecture outline n Assignments n Term Project n Grading Introduction to Automatic Speech Recognition 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 3 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 4 Communication via Spoken Language Speech Speech Input Output Text Text Meaning Understanding Generation Human Computer 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 5 Automatic Speech Recognition 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 6 Virtues of Spoken Language Natural: Requires no special training Flexible: Leaves hands and eyes free Efficient: Has high data rate Economical: Can be transmitted/received inexpensively Speech interfaces are ideal for information access and management when: The information space is broad and complex, The users are technically naive, or Only telephones are available 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 7 Diverse Sources of Constraint for Spoken Language Communication Phonological: gas shortage fish sandwich Acoustic: human vocal tract Phonotactic: blit vnuk Contextual: It is easy to recognize speech It is easy to wreck a nice beach Syntactic: I am flying to Chicago tomorrow tomorrow I flying Chicago am to Phonetic: let us pray lettuce spray Semantic: Is the baby crying Is the bay bee crying 2/13/12 Veton Kpuska 8 Useful Definitions u phonology Pronunciation: f&-'n-l&-jE, fO- Function: noun Date: 1799 1 : the science of speech sounds including especially the history and theory of sound changes in a language or in two or more related languages 2 : the phonetics and phonemics of a language at a particular time u phonetics Pronunciation: f&-'ne-tiks Function: noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1836 1 : the system of speech sounds of a language or group of languages 2 a : the study and systematic classification of the sounds made in spoken utterance b : the practical application of this science to language study u phonotactics Pronunciation: "fo-n&-'tak-tiks Function: noun plural but singular in construction Date: 1956 : the area of phonology concerned with the analysis and description of the permitted sound sequences of a language Useful Definitions u semantics /s mnt ks/ Show Spelled[si-man-tiks] Show IPA noun ( used with a singular verb ) 1. Linguistics . a. the study of meaning. b. the study of linguistic development by classifying and examining changes in meaning and form. 2. Also called significs. the branch of semiotics dealing with the relations...
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course ECE 5526 taught by Professor Staff during the Summer '09 term at FIT.

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Ch0-Introduction - ECE-5527 Speech Recognition Introduction...

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