{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Internet Transport Protocols

Internet Transport Protocols - Computer Networks 2 The...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
February 13, 2012 Veton K ë puska 1 Computer Networks 2 The Internet Transport Protocol
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
February 13, 2012 Veton Këpuska 2 The Internet Transport Protocols Internet has two main protocols in transport  layer: Connectionless Protocol (UDP), and Connection-oriented Protocol (TCP). UPD (User Datagram Protocol) UDP is IP with just a short header added. UDP provides a way for applications to send  encapsulated UP datagrams and send them  without having to establish a connection.
Background image of page 2
February 13, 2012 Veton Këpuska 3 UPD (User Datagram Protocol) UDP transmits segments consisting of 8-byte header followed by the payload: Source and Destination Ports: Two ports are used to identify the end points within the source and destination  machines. The main advantage of the UDP over just using raw IP is the addition of the  source and destination ports. Without the port fields, the transport layer would not  know what to do with the packet. Source Port are primarily needed when a reply must be send back to the source.  (Source port field is copied from the incoming segment into the destination port  field of the outgoing segment). UDP packets are handed to the process attached to the destination process.  This attachment occurs when a BIND (or a similar) primitive is used.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
February 13, 2012 Veton Këpuska 4 UPD (User Datagram Protocol) UDP length field: Includes 80-byte header and payload data. UDP Checksum: Optional field. What UDP does not do: Flow Control Error Control Retransmission upon receipted of a bad segment. User application responsible for control over the  packet flow, error control and timing.
Background image of page 4
February 13, 2012 Veton Këpuska 5 UPD (User Datagram Protocol) UDP useful in client-server situations: Client sends a short request to the server and expects a short reply back. If either  the request or reply is lost, the client can just time out and try again. Simple code  Fewer messages are required compared to protocols that require initial setup. Typical application using UDP is DNS (the Domain Name System). An application that needs to look up the IP address of some host name (e.g.,  www.cs.berkeley.edu ) can send a UDP packet containing the host name to a  DSN server. Server replies with a UDP packet containing the host’s IP address.  No setup is needed in advance and no release is needed afterward. Just two  messages go over the network.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
February 13, 2012 Veton Këpuska 6 Remote Procedure Call Sending a message to a remote host and getting a reply back, in a certain  sense is a lot like making a function call in a programming language:
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}