5310 Combustion Introduction Lecture 2

5310 Combustion Introduction Lecture 2 - MAE 5310:...

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MAE 5310: COMBUSTION FUNDAMENTALS Lecture 2: Thermochemistry Review August 25, 2011 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department Florida Institute of Technology D. R. Kirk
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EQUATION OF STATE An equation of state provides a relationship among P , T and V (or ρ ) of a substance Ideal gas behavior (neglect intermolecular forces and volume of molecules themselves): P= ρ RT Pv=RT PV=mRT R=R universal /MW, R universal =8314 J/kmol K Assumption is appropriate for nearly all systems we will consider in MAE 5310 since high temperatures associated with combustion generally result in sufficiently low densities for ideal gas behavior to be a reasonable approximation Aside: Real gas laws try to predict true behavior of a gas better than ideal gas law by putting in terms to describe attractions and repulsions between molecules These laws have been determined empirically or based on a conceptual model of molecular interactions or from statistical mechanics Examples: van der Waals and Redlich-Kwong equations
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1 st LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS Fixed Mass In Words: Heat added to system in going from state 1 to state 2 ( Q ) minus work done by system in going from state 1 to state 2 ( W ) equals change in total system energy ( E ) in going from state 1 to state 2 Control Volume In Words: Rate of heat transferred across control surface from the surroundings to control volume minus rate of all work done by control volume (including shaft work, but excluding flow work) equals rate of energy flowing out of control volume minus rate of energy flowing into control volume plus net rate of work associated with pressure forces where fluid crosses the control surface, called flow work Assumptions: CV is fixed relative to coordinate system Properties of fluid at each point within CV, or on the CS, do not vary with time Fluid properties are uniform over inlet and outlet flow areas Only one inlet and outlet stream – keep this form simple, but can be easily relaxed to allow
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course MAE 5310 taught by Professor Danielkirk during the Fall '09 term at FIT.

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5310 Combustion Introduction Lecture 2 - MAE 5310:...

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