3241 Lecture 10

3241 Lecture 10 - MAE 3241 AERODYNAMICS AND FLIGHT MECHANICS Introduction to Finite Wings and Induced Drag Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

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Unformatted text preview: MAE 3241: AERODYNAMICS AND FLIGHT MECHANICS Introduction to Finite Wings and Induced Drag Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department Florida Institute of Technology D. R. Kirk AIRFOILS VERSUS WINGS L o w P ressu re L o w P ressu re • Upper surface (upper side of wing): low pressure – Recall discussion on exactly why this is physically – Recall discussion on how to show this mathematically AIRFOILS VERSUS WINGS H i g h P r e s s u r e H i g h P r e s s u r e L o w P ressu re L o w P ressu re • Upper surface (upper side of wing): low pressure • Lower surface (underside of wing): high pressure AIRFOILS VERSUS WINGS H i g h P r e s s u r e H i g h P r e s s u r e L o w P ressu re L o w P ressu re • Upper surface (upper side of wing): low pressure • Lower surface (underside of wing): high pressure • Flow always desires to go from high pressure to low pressure • Flow ‘wraps’ around wing tips FINITE WINGS Front View Wing Tip Vortices FINITE WINGS FINITE WINGS FINITE WINGS AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT 587 • American Airlines Flight 587 crashed into the Belle Harbor neighborhood of Queens in New York City shortly after takeoff from John F. Kennedy International Airport on November 12, 2001. This was the second deadliest U.S. aviation accident to date. • On November 12, 2001, about 0916:15 eastern standard time, American Airlines flight 587, an Airbus Industries A300-605R, N14053, crashed into a residential area of Belle Harbor, New York, shortly after takeoff from John F. Kennedy International Airport, Jamaica, New York. Flight 587 was a regularly scheduled passenger flight to Las Americas International Airport, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, with 2 flight crewmembers, 7 flight attendants, and 251 passengers aboard the plane. The plane’s vertical stabilizer and rudder separated in flight and were found in Jamaica Bay, about 1 mile north of the main wreckage site. The plane’s engines subsequently separated in flight and were found several blocks north and east of the main wreckage site. All 260 people aboard the plane and 5 people on the ground were killed, and the plane was destroyed by impact forces and a postcrash fire. • The official National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) report of October 26, 2004, stated that the cause of the crash was the overuse of the rudder to counter wake turbulence AMERICAN AIRLINES FLIGHT 587 • The A300-600, which took off just minutes after a Japan Airlines Boeing 747 on the same runway, flew into the larger jet's wake, an area of very turbulent air. The first officer attempted to keep the plane upright with the rudder. The strength of the air flowing against the moving rudder stressed the aircraft's vertical stabilizer and eventually snapped it off entirely, causing the aircraft to lose control and crash....
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course MAE 3241 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '11 term at FIT.

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3241 Lecture 10 - MAE 3241 AERODYNAMICS AND FLIGHT MECHANICS Introduction to Finite Wings and Induced Drag Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

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