AC562_Evidence - AC562 Fraud Fraud Evidence Fraud Evidence...

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AC562 – Fraud Fraud Evidence
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Fraud Evidence and Auditing Sufficient evidence for conviction of fraud is usually lacking in fraud audits. Auditors tend to develop the consequences of fraud, such as the amount of the theft, but fall short in naming the people involved in the manner that is acceptable to the court. At least half of fraud cases that could have advanced to prosecution do not.
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Indicative Evidence l Fraud may have occurred, but there is no proof. l Little evidence l Auditors start sifting through large amounts of data to look for leads or indications. l Ask questions about the incidents as to whether they are an indication of fraud. l Auditors should act in a "gotcha" manner, rather than expecting only an oversight on findings. l Quietly note the indiscretion on work papers, and begin to investigate further. l Examine relate contracts or transactions for similar problems.
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Validating Evidence l Change search from discover to validation l Still in the preliminary stages, as fraud has not yet been
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course AC 562 AC 562 taught by Professor Online during the Spring '11 term at Keller Graduate School of Management.

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AC562_Evidence - AC562 Fraud Fraud Evidence Fraud Evidence...

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