Poli 232 lecture notes jan

Poli 232 lecture notes jan - HobbesChapter13 17:28...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hobbes Chapter 1-3 17:28 Historical background: Lived 1588-1679 Oxford education Attacked on the ancients and Aristotle  Well-versed in philosophy through European travels  o Descartes Montagne, Galileo  Leviathan written in Paris in mid 1600s, defending royalist cause in the civil  war, 1642-1651 o Charles 1 is executed  Intellectual Background  1660 – restoration  influences are both ancient (Aristotle) and modern (Descartes and Montaigne)  Ancient – all matter at rest; Galileo – all matter in motion  o Hobbes applies this modern though through his views on humans  Ancient – final ends in all actions and a teleological view of nature; Hobbes –  no end to which we are striving as human beings, no political form to fulfill  nature  Epistemic and moral skepticism  o No international standards, what moral concepts are relevant? Major question he asks: “How do we know what is absolutely morally just?” Dislikes religious fanaticism  o Gives people the freedom to do what they want for hope in reaching an  afterlife  Introduction 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Commonwealth = artificial type of man  o How god creates us, we create a commonwealth and it is therefore an  artificial version of us  o Beginning of views on social contract  Religious beliefs may or may not be genuine but his concern for social order  is  Takes apart society to smallest parts n hopes of analyzing politics most  efficiently  Chapter 1 All knowledge begins with sense through an input of information from external  objects that produces motion of organs that then leads to outward motion  Imagination is mechanistic 
Background image of page 2
17:28 Historic:  Main concern of civil war  Cartesian skepticism – relation between ideas in our head and reality exists? Intellectual: Cartesian skepticism  Montaigne’s moral relativism  Galileo  Aristotle: doctrine of causes, teleology, correspondence Sense  Motion of external particles hits organs, causing what we see as vision  o Goes to past experience of image in imagination  Counter motions: Aversions and appetites  Always many movements all the time  o Old and decaying = memory  Sleeping: no external imposition but still matter in motion so only imagination,  compounded out of real images seen  Chapter  2 – Empiricism  3 – materialism, mechanistic view of the universe  4-5 – nominalism and right reasons  6-11 – Inference from the passions, disagree about objects of passions and  aversions but have some ideas towards these different passions and  aversions  Difference between waking and dreaming 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course POLI 232 taught by Professor Levy during the Spring '08 term at McGill.

Page1 / 14

Poli 232 lecture notes jan - HobbesChapter13 17:28...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online