11 Convention (V) respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers

11 Convention (V) respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers

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Convention (V) respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers and Persons in Case of War on Land. The Hague, 18 October 1907. State parties (32) / State signatories (17) General title: Second Peace Conference of The Hague, 1907. Forum of adoption: International Peace Conference 1907 Entry into force: 26.01.1910 The law of neutrality was mainly developed during the 19th century. The most important factors in its development were the two Armed Neutralities of 1780 and 1800, the attitude of the United States towards neutrality, the permanent neutrality of Switzerland and Belgium and the Declaration of Paris of 1856. At the Second Hague Peace Conference the subject seemed to be ready for codification. In spite of being to a large extent declaratory of existing international law, the two Conventions on neutrality concluded at The Hague were not ratified by Great Britain, Italy and some other States. Apart from the two conventions other Conventions concluded in 1907 are also important for the law of neutrality, particularly the Convention (VII) relating to the Conversion of Merchant Ships into War-Ships, the Convention (XI) relative to Certain Restrictions with regard to the Exercise of the Right of Capture in Naval War and the Convention (XII) relative to the Creation of an International Prize Court. Furthermore, the unratified Declaration of London of 1909 contained the most important rules concerning neutrality in naval war. As a consequence of the two World Wars, the prohibition of the resort to war and the systems of collective security established by the League of Nations and the United Nations, the traditional law of neutrality has lost much of its former importance. Meetings of forum: 15.06.1907 - 18.10.1907, The Hague Date of adoption: 18.10.1907 Depositary: Netherlands Number of articles: 25 Authentic text: French SourceD.Schindler and J.Toman, The Laws of Armed Conflicts, Martinus Nihjoff Publisher, 1988, pp.942-947. With a view to laying down more clearly the rights and duties of neutral Powers in case of war on land and regulating the position of the belligerents who have taken refuge in neutral territory; Being likewise desirous of defining the meaning of the term "neutral," pending the possibility of settling, in its entirety, the position of neutral individuals in their relations with the belligerents; Have resolved to conclude a Convention to this effect, and have, in consequence, appointed the following as their plenipotentiaries: (Here follow the names of Plenipotentiaries.) Who, after having deposited their full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following provisions: CHAPTER I THE RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF NEUTRAL POWERS Article 1. The territory of neutral Powers is inviolable. Art. 2. Belligerents are forbidden to move troops or convoys of either munitions of war or
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course GENERAL ST 410 taught by Professor Huck during the Fall '11 term at Berea.

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11 Convention (V) respecting the Rights and Duties of Neutral Powers

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