DEVELOPMENTS IN THE LAW.1

DEVELOPMENTS IN THE LAW.1 - Page 1 FOCUS - 2 of 7 DOCUMENTS...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Page 1 FOCUS - 2 of 7 DOCUMENTS Copyright (c) 2001 The Harvard Law Review Association Harvard Law Review May, 2001 114 Harv. L. Rev. 1943 LENGTH: 4492 words DEVELOPMENTS IN THE LAW -- INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL LAW: BIO: * The Development authors would like to thank the Harvard Law School faculty, in particular Martha Minow, Anne-Marie Slaughter, and Henry Steiner, for helpful guidance throughout this project. LEXISNEXIS SUMMARY: ... In the summer and autumn of 1998, two events captured headlines around the world and heralded the arrival of a new era of accountability for violations of international criminal law. ... For example, how should it be enforced: criminally or civilly, domestically or internationally? Should enforcement focus on individuals, states, or other entities such as corporations? What special challenges does international prosecution present for the prosecution and the de- fense? How will judicial elaboration affect the content of the substantive prohibitions contained in international crim- inal law? How do international human rights norms constrain domestic criminal procedure and the punishments that na- tions can impose upon criminals? More fundamentally, what is the relationship between national and international criminal law? The explosion of international criminal law in the last decade has begun to answer some of these ques- tions, even as it raises others. . .. A. A Brief History of International Criminal Law ... In recent years, the international community has begun to move beyond norm articulation toward norm enforcement in international criminal law. "In- ternational criminal law " itself is an elusive concept. . .. Part II considers the two most important new institutions in in- ternational criminal law: the ICTY and the ICTR. . .. It suggests that more realistic expectations for international pro- secution will allow the international community to adopt a more flexible and effective approach to ensuring that violat- ors of international criminal law are held accountable. . .. TEXT: [*1944] [*1945] [*1946] [*1947] I. Introduction* In the summer and autumn of 1998, two events captured headlines around the world and heralded the arrival of a new era of accountability for violations of international criminal law . First, in June, representatives of more than 150 na- tions gathered in Rome to negotiate a treaty to create an international criminal court. n1 After five weeks of tense debate, 120 nations n2 voted in favor of the Rome Statute, n3 which would create the International Criminal Court (ICC) to pro- secute perpetrators of genocide, war crimes, crimes against humanity, and aggression, n4 thus realizing a goal that had arisen fifty years earlier. n5
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 9

DEVELOPMENTS IN THE LAW.1 - Page 1 FOCUS - 2 of 7 DOCUMENTS...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online