Drafting the ICC

Drafting the ICC - Drafting the International Criminal...

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Unformatted text preview: Drafting the International Criminal Court Treaty: Two Years to Rome and an Afterword on the Rome Diplomatic Conference Author(s): Fanny Benedetti and John L. Washburn Reviewed work(s): Source: Global Governance, Vol. 5, No. 1 (Jan.Mar. 1999), pp. 1-37 Published by: Lynne Rienner Publishers Stable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/27800218 . Accessed: 10/12/2011 15:30 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. Lynne Rienner Publishers is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Global Governance. http://www.jstor.org Global Governance 5 (1999), 1-37 Drafting the International Criminal Court Treaty: Two Years toRome and an Afterword on the Rome Diplomatic Conference Fanny Benedetti and John L. Washburn Two Years to Rome The UN Preparatory Committee on the Establishment of an International Criminal Court (known as the PrepCom) ended its last session on 3 April 1998 in Conference Room 1 of the UN headquarters building in New York. Some 130 government delegations were ranged in their long arcs of seats on the floor. Representatives of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs)?their advocating, advising, and remonstrating finished for now?completely filled three tiers of chairs against one wall of the room. The chairman, Adriaan Bos of the Netherlands, told the PrepCom that it had achieved a draft text of a treaty to establish an international criminal court that, with luck, the forthcoming diplomatic conference inRome might well be able to negotiate intofinal form."You have done this," he said to the delegates, "through your seriousness, your willingness to compromise, your hard work, and your expertise."1 In their responding speeches, the delega tions agreed with him and went on to praise indetail his chairmanship, the work of theother officers of the PrepCom, and the skills and devotion of the UN Secretariat team supporting them. They thanked interpreters and confer ence personnel and?at length, for their help and contributions?NGOs. Such statements are routine at the end of any set of negotiations, but a great many of the statementsmade on thisoccasion were clearly heartfelt as well. Amid the predictable exhaustion, relief, and slight sadness at the end of any long common enterprise, these government officials, diplomats, and lawyers were confirming to each other that the PrepCom had been no ordinary negotiating experience....
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Drafting the ICC - Drafting the International Criminal...

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