Chp_6_Notes - Training is big business! In 2002, U.S....

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1 Organizational Learning Chapter 6 Training is big business! In 2002, U.S. businesses spent over $60 billion on training programs In 2000, 78% of employees trained 2004, President Bush allocated 11 billion to the Employment and Training Administration http://www.doleta.gov Why do Organizations train? New employees lack knowledge or skills to perform adequately Job incumbents are performing below expectations Future oriented training developing current employees for promotions • On average, employee’s knowledge and skills become outdated every 30 60 months! Training : the process through which the knowledge and skills of employees are enhanced Development: skill-enhancing processes for managerial- level personnel 2 ways to deal with the necessity of training Seek trainable personnel Adopt a continuous learning environment Dual responsibility Organization Individual The Ideal Process Training Performance Learning A set of planned activities on the part of the organization to increase job knowledge or skill or to modify attitudes and social behaviors in ways that are consistent with organizational goals and objectives A relatively permanent change in behavior that come through experience --something that takes place inside the person, a change of some sort A response of some sort -a good performance implies the correct response
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2 Learning The process by which change in knowledge or skills is acquired through education or experience 3 phases of skill acquisition Declarative knowledge Knowledge compilation phase Procedural knowledge Three Classes of Abilities General Intellectual Ability Important in declarative knowledge attention demands are high Perceptual Speed Abilities Important in procedural knowledge Basic understanding of how to perform attention demands reduce Psychomotor ability Procedural knowledge phase Based primarily on coordination Experts vs. Novices Three distinguishing features of experts: Automaticity (vs. Proceduralization) Mental Models Meta-Cognition Self-efficacy -sense of personal control and being able to master one’s environment Training and Development Phases Pretraining Needs Analysis Training Methods -Design Implementation Posttraining -Evaluation Needs Assessment Organizational Analysis Task (and KSAO) Analysis Person Analysis
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3 Organizational Needs Analysis What are our goals, resources, and environment? Is there Organizational support for training? Can training help organization meet its goals and objectives Links training to strategic plans Transfer of Training Moving skills from training context to organizational context Use Interviews Climate and attitude surveys Task (and KSAO) Needs Analysis What duties, tasks, behaviors, and actions need to be improved? What do the jobs needing training require?
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This note was uploaded on 02/11/2012 for the course PSYCHOLOGY 210 taught by Professor Henning during the Fall '11 term at Berea.

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Chp_6_Notes - Training is big business! In 2002, U.S....

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